Posts tagged ‘Saints who worked on Magazines’

Venerable Manuel Nunes Formigão

Venerable Manuel Nunes FormigãoProfile

Baptised at the age of seven weeks. Feeling an early call to the priesthood, he entered the minor seminary in Farrobo, Portugal in 1895 at the age of 12. Joined the Archconfraternity of the Imaculado Coração de Maria on 6 June 1896. Began studying theology at the major seminary in Santarém, Portugal in 1900, and earned a doctorate in canon law from the Gregorian University in Rome, Italy on 13 July 1906 at the age of 23. Ordained in Rome as a priest for the diocese of Leiria-Fátima, Portugal on 4 April 1908. He received his doctorate in theology in 1909, and began teaching at the Santarém seminary.

Called upon to investigate the apparitions of Our Lady in Fatima, he became convinced of their validity. He witnessed the final apparition, became a mentor and father figure to the seers, and began spreading the message of Our Lady. Transferred to the Diocese of Bragança, Portugal on 15 October 1934, in 1935 he founded two youth care centers there. Founded the magazine Stella in 1937. Founded the Messenger of Bragança in 1940. Founded the Almanac of Our Lady of Fatima in 1942. Founded of the Congregation of the Sisters of Reparation of Our Lady of Fatima.

Born

Died

Venerated

MLA Citation

  • “Venerable Manuel Nunes Formigão“. CatholicSaints.Info. 29 May 2018. Web. 22 October 2019. <>

Saint Nazaria Ignacia March y Mesa

Saint Nazaria Ignacia March y MesaAlso known as

  • Nazaire de Sainte-Thérèse March Mesa
  • Nazaria Ignacia de Santa Teresa de Jesus

Memorial

Profile

Fourth of eighteen children born to José Alejandro March y Reus, a merchant, fisherman and industrial worker, and Nazaria Mesa Ramos; Nazaira had a twin sister, Ignazia, and ten brothers who survived infancy. She and her sister were baptized on the day they were born, Nazaria made her First Communion on 21 November 1898 and made a personal vow of consecration to God. Unlike many children who are drawn to religious life at an early age, her family was indifferent to the faith, and grew so tired of her of her devotions that they once “grounded” her from going to Mass. By the time she was confirmed on 15 March 1902, which was celebrated by Blessed Marcelo Spínola y Maestre, her family had grown used to her piety, and allowed her to join the Franciscan Third Order and more actively practice her faith. She succeeded in getting several of them to return to the Church.

In late 1904, business failures led the family to move to Mexico. On the trip, Nazarie met sisters in the Instituto de Hermanitas de los Ancianos Desamparados (Institute of Sisters of the Abandoned Elders), and was so inspired by their charism that on 7 December 1908 she followed a calling to religious life, and entered the Institute in Mexico City, Mexico; she made her perpetual vows on 1 January 1915, and took the name Sister Nazaire de Sainte-Thérèse. Her diaries of the time show a deep devotion to her calling, but struggles with her vows of obedience to her superiors.

She was assigned to the Institute hospice in Oruro, Bolivia where she worked as a cook, housekeeper, nurse and occasional beggar to support the poor and neglected for twelve years. The region around Oruro was not entirely Christian, many Protestant groups were establishing missions, and the few priests in the area were often lax or lived scandalous lives. Beginning in 1920 Sister Nazaire began to feel a call to found a new congregation devoted to missionary work, evanglization and religious education. On 18 January 1925, the feast of the Chair of Saint Peter, Sister Nazaire made a special vow of obedience to the Pope, and on Pentecost that year she made a vow to work for the union and extension of the Holy Catholic Church. On 16 June 1925, with six other sisters, she founded the Pontifical Crusade, later renamed the Congregation of the Missionary Crusaders of the Church, and began service as their superior. The mission of the Congregation was to catechize children and adults, support the work of priests, conduct missions, and to print and distribute short religious tracts.

Mother Nazaire met with opposition to her work, much of it from within Church administration. Her sisters in the Institute treated her as a traitor to her original vocation for turning away from their work; her superiors considered her disobedient, and some Claretian clergy considered her a glory-hound, ignoring all the help members of their order had given her. But Nazaire clung to Christ and pressed on.

Monsignor Felipe Cortesi, while in Bolivia, had worked to help Mother Nazaire to found the Congregation. When he was assigned to be the apostolic nuncio of Argentina in 1930, he asked had her open a Missionary Crusader house in Buenos Aires. The Congregation received an early test under fire during the 1932 to 1935 war between Bolivia and Paraguay; Mother Nazaire and the sisters cared for and brought the sacraments to soldiers on both sides, and helped establish homes for war orphans. In 1934 she founded the first magazine in Bolivia for women in religious life, Al Adalid de Cristo Rey, and the first female trade union, Sociedad de Obrera Católicas

In early 1934, Monsignor Cortesi asked the Vatican Congregation of Religious to approve the rules for the Crusaders that Nazaire had written, based on Ignatian spirituality. Later that year, Mother Nazaria travelled to Rome with an Argentinian pilgrimage group to work for the approval of her Rule. She made pilgrimages to several sites, and had a private audience with Pope Pius XI during which Nazaire said that she was willing to die for the Church; the Pope told her that she must, instead, live and work for the Church.

Leaving Italy for her native Spain, Mother Nazaire founded a retreat center for spiritual exercises in Madrid under the flag of Uruguay; the sisters there survived the Spanish Civil War as Franco did not wish to risk the international incident killing them would cause. With the help of the Bolivian government, Mother Nazaria was able to leave the persecutions in Spain and return to the Americas. She summoned a general chapter of the Congregation in 1937 to strengthen the unity and zeal of her sisters. Worked on the spiritual formation of new sisters, and set an example by her pious, simple life. To the superiors of the Congregation houses she always recommended a maternal approach to the sisters in their care, to remember their role as Mother of the house. When the Spanish Civil War ended, Nazaire returned to Spain to check on the sisters she had left behind, then returned to the Americas for the final time. The Congregation spread throughout South America and began to work in Portugal, Spain, France, Italy and Camaroon. Though Nazaire did not live to see it, the Congregation received Vatican recognition on 9 June 1947 by Pope Pius XII.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Canonized

Patronage

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Nazaria Ignacia March y Mesa“. CatholicSaints.Info. 1 February 2019. Web. 22 October 2019. <>

Blessed Giuseppe Giaccardo

detail of a photograph of Blessed Giuseppe Giaccardo, date, photographer and location unknown; swiped from Santi e BeatiAlso known as

  • Father Timoteo

Memorial

Profile

Oldest of five children born to farm workers Stefano and Maria Cagna; his mother was devoted to Our Lady of the Rosary. When financial troubles hit, his father worked as a butcher and sacristan, and Giuseppe spent his early years in a house adjacent to his parish church; at one point he served as an altar boy for Blessed Giacomo Alberione, his future superior. Giuseppe early felt a call to the priesthood, and began his studies in October 1908; he was known as an exceptional student in seminary, but would not talk about it. Drafted into the army on 22 January 1915, he worked in a medical unit and later said that the locations of his military assignments put a severe test to his vows of chastity. He was released from service on 7 January 1916 due to chronic anemia, and returned to seminary where he spent his spare time tutoring other students.

Father Alberione wanted the young seminarian to work with him in his new Society of Saint Paul, but Giuseppe was informed that he could only remain a cleric if he stayed in seminary. He joined the Society on 7 April 1917, trained and supervised student printers, edited and proofread books and periodicals, all the while continuing his studies. Ordained on 19 October 1919, the first professed priest in the Society. He made his profession within the Society on 30 June 1920, taking the name Timoteo in honour of the disciple of Saint Paul the Apostle. He preached retreats, heard confessions, and each Sunday walked the 8 miles to Benevello, Italy to celebrate Mass for the parish there. He earned a degree in theology, with honours, from the College of Saint Thomas in Geona, Italy on 12 November 1920.

As the Society continued to grow, so did Father Timoteo’s work load. He was noted within the Society for spreading the word of the Faith and of the Church’s stance against the Facism that was coming to power in Italy; he was also known for his lack of administrative and financial skills, which often put him at odds with Father Alberione and dealing with overdue bills. Still, his devotion was so powerful that Father Alberione assigned Father Giuseppe to found the Society‘s first house in Rome, Italy; Pope Pius XI jumped for joy at the news. On 15 January 1926, Father Giuseppe and 14 students opened a small print shop in Rome, and began work on twelve diocesan weekly publications. Father Timoteo and his crew lived in a renovated warehouse with limited plumbing and no chapel. With no other priests to assist him, Father Timoteo served as house superior, father figure, spiritual director of both his house and the newly arrived group of Daughters of Saint Paul, house treasurer, and supervisor of the printing work they all did. They were perpetually short of money, and his work never ended, but visitors noted the serenity and dedication that pervaded the living and working areas.

In July 1927, Don Giaccardo managed to purchase a old vineyard from the Benedictines; the barn was transformed into a chapel, the winery to print shop, and the farm house into improved quarters for the Society; it became a central point for training, study and spiritual formation of new members of the Society. Father Giuseppe was made superior in Rome in 1932. On 10 June 1936, the old vineyard was designated the mother-house of the Society, and Don Giaccardo its superior; he laboured at task for the next decade, which were his most active years, and the period when the house was most know for its piety, observance and community. He worked with about 500 students and seminarians in Alba, Italy during this period, and kept his community together during the privations of World War II. Celebrated Mass every Friday at the mother house of the Pauline Sisters. He carried a small edition of the epistles of Saint Paul, and consulted them frequently for wisdom in dealing with his community; falsehoods saddened him, he would lose sleep to pray for Society members who had a conflict, he saw all history as being centered on Christ, and encouraged members of the Society to use all forms of media to spread the Faith.

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Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

Readings

For me, the Gospel is the book of humility. Blessed Giuseppe

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Giuseppe Giaccardo“. CatholicSaints.Info. 28 January 2019. Web. 22 October 2019. <>

Blessed Giuseppe Antonio Tovini

Blessed Giuseppe Antonio ToviniMemorial

Profile

Eldest of seven children born to Moses and Rosa Malaguzzi; uncle and god-father of Blessed Mose Tovini. Studied law at the University of Padua, and worked at a firm in Lovere, Italy. Teacher and deputy director of a local college. Moved to diocese of Brescia, Italy in 1864. Mayor of Cividate Camuno, Italy from 1871 to 1874 where he worked to improve public construction. Married to Emilia Corbolani in the church of Saint Agatha in Brescia on 6 January 1875; father of ten, two of whom became nuns, and one a Jesuit. Member of the Secular Franciscans. Founded the Catholic newspaper Il Cittadino di Brescia (The City of Brescia) in 1878. President of the diocesan Committee of the Opera dei Congressi. Municipal and provincial councilor in Brescia where he worked to defend and help the poor and alienated. Founded the Saint Joseph Kindergarten and the College of Venerable A Luzzago in 1882. Founded the Banco Ambrosiano in Milan, Italy in 1888. Founded the Banca Santa Paolo in Brescia in 1888. Founded the Society for the Preservation of the Faith in Italian Schools in 1890. Founded the journal Faith and School in 1891. Help found an insurance company for Catholic teachers. Helped founded the Union Leone XIII to support the faith of students in university in Brescia, and worked support similar groups in other schools. Founded the magazine Modern Italian School in 1893. Founded the weekly journal La Voce del Popolo in 1893. Helped the Canossian sisters found a teaching college in Cividate Camuno in 1894. Supported the Catholic University Federation, and the creation of Catholic universities in Italy.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Giuseppe Antonio Tovini“. CatholicSaints.Info. 15 June 2019. Web. 22 October 2019. <>

Blessed Stefan Grelewski

Blessed Stefan GrelewskiAlso known as

  • prisoner 10444 (Auschwitz)
  • prisoner 25581 (Dachau)

Memorial

Profile

Older brother of Blessed Kazimierz Grelewski. Studied at the Progimnazjum in Sandomierz and Lubartów in Poland. Ordained in October 1921 as a priest in the archdiocese of Radom, Poland. Graduated with a doctorate in canon law in Strasbourg, France in 1924. General secretary of the Christian Workers Union in Radom in 1925. Writer, journalist, and translated works from French and German to Polish. Founded the magazine Catholic Truth in 1930. Worked with the people of Catholic Action and the Association of Polish Intelligence. Helped organize the first diocesan Eucharistic Congress in Radom in 1933. Prefect of a boy‘s elementary school from 1928 through 1931; prefect of the Jan Kochanowski state boy‘s grammar school from 1932 until the outbreak of World War II in 1939. During the Nazi occupation of Poland, he covertly continued teaching religion. Arrested with his brother on 24 January 1941 as part of the Nazi persecutions, he was deported, imprisoned and tortured in the concentration camps of Auschwitz and then Dachau. Martyr.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Stefan Grelewski“. CatholicSaints.Info. 31 October 2017. Web. 22 October 2019. <>

Blessed Ludwik Bartosik

Blessed Ludwik BartosikAlso known as

Memorial

Profile

Eldest son of Wojciech, a poor shoemaker, and Wiktoria Tomczyk. With the help of his parish priest, Ludwik obtained a good education. Joined the Franciscan Conventual Friars in 1926, taking the name Pius. Studied in Franciscan seminaries in Sanok, then Lviv and finally Krakow, Poland. Ordained on 23 June 1935. Noted confessor at the Franciscan convent in Krosno, Poland. At the request of Saint Maximilian Kolbe, Father Pius was transferred to the convent at Niepokalanów, Poland in August 1936 where he worked in a number of positions, including editor of the magazines Knight of the Immaculate, Little Knight of the Immaculate and Miles Immaculatae, all the while continuing to serve as confessor to his brother friars. Wrote a number of works including a noted book of Mariology. Imprisoned by invading German troops on 19 September 1939 and transferred to several prisons, finally ending at the Auschwitz forced labour concentration camp. He continued his vocation as confessor to other prisoners. Martyred in the Nazi persecutions of World War II.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Ludwik Bartosik“. CatholicSaints.Info. 19 June 2018. Web. 22 October 2019. <>

Blessed Hanna Helena Chrzanowska

Blessed Hanna Helena ChrzanowskaMemorial

Profile

Lay woman in the diocese of Kraków, Poland. She was the daughter of Ignacy Chrzanowski, a university professor, and Wanda Szlenkier, and while their industrialist and land-owning families had a tradition of charity, religious involvement at home was low since one side of the family was Catholic, the other Protestant. She attended an Ursuline high school. Helped care for soldiers wounded and injured in the Bolshevik revolution, then began studies at the School of Nursing in Warsaw, Poland in 1920; studied in France on a scholarship, and worked with members of the American Red Cross.

She became a nurse in a time when the profession was not as respected as today, and became a leading light in the field in her region. Instructor of the University School of Nurses and Hygienists in Kraków from 1926 to 1929. Editor of the monthly publication Nurse Poland from 1929 to 1939. Worked to help form the Catholic Association of Polish Nurses in 1937. Member of the Oblates of the Order of Saint Benedict. During World War II, where she lost her father to the concentration camps, Hanna organized nurses for home care in Warsaw, and helped feed and resettle war refugees. Following the war she became head of a nursing home where, in addition to the administrative duties, she cared for the residents and worked with nursing students. Director of the School of Psychiatric Nursing in Kobierzyn, Poland until the Communists closed it. She then moved into nursing the poor and neglected in her own parish. Fought with cancer the final seven years of her life.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Hanna Helena Chrzanowska“. CatholicSaints.Info. 29 June 2018. Web. 22 October 2019. <>

Blessed Buenaventura García-Paredes Pallasá

Blessed Buenaventura García-Paredes PallasáMemorial

Profile

Born to a pious family of shepherds, and he worked the fields as a boy. Educated at the Dominican Apostolic School. Dominican novice in Toledo, Spain; he made his solemn profession in 1887, taking the name Bonaventure of Saint Louis Bertran. Studied theology in Avila, Salamanca, Valencia and Madrid in Spain, concentrating on the works of Saint Thomas Aquinas. Priest, ordained on 25 July 1891 in Avila. Obtained doctorates in philosophy and civil law. Returned to Avila where he taught and began writing. Prior of his house in 1901. Opened a school in Segovia, Spain. Superior of the province of Manila, Philippines on 14 May 1910. Supervised the building of schools and hospitals in China, Japan and Vietnam; he worked to recruit more Dominican friars, and to insure the proper spiritual formation of those novices. Founded the magazine Missiones Dominicans. Built the Theological Study Center of New Orleans, Louisiana. Elected reluctant Master-General of the Dominicans on 22 May 1926; he was actually hoping to retire, but accepted the duty. Martyred in the persecutions of the Spanish Civil War.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Buenaventura García-Paredes Pallasá“. CatholicSaints.Info. 5 August 2015. Web. 22 October 2019. <>

Blessed Stanislaw Antoni Trojanowski

Blessed Stanislaw Antoni TrojanowskiAlso known as

  • Tymoteusz
  • Timoteo Trojanowski
  • Stanislaw Tymoteusz Trojanowski
  • prisoner 25431

Memorial

Profile

Born to a poor, rural family, he had limited schooling and had to work from an early age. Joined the Friars Minor Conventual in Niepokalanów, Poland on 5 March 1930, taking the name Tymoteusz and making his solemn profession on 11 February 1935. Worked in the convent infirmary, and the warehouse and shipping departments of the magazine Rycerz Niepokalanej (Knight of the Immaculate) with its founder Saint Maximilian Kolbe. At one point Brother Tymoteusz tried to go to the foreign missions, but gave it up when the Nazis invaded Poland to start World War II. Arrested with six of his brother friars in October 1941 by the Gestapo, and sentenced for forced labour at the Auschwitz death camp for the crime of being Catholic. Ministered to his fellow prisoners in his remaining few months. Martyr.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Stanislaw Antoni Trojanowski“. CatholicSaints.Info. 25 February 2017. Web. 22 October 2019. <>

Blessed Paolo Manna

detail of a protrait of Blessed Paolo; artist unknown; swiped from Wikimedia CommonsMemorial

Profile

Fifth of six children. Educated at Avellino and Naples in Italy. Studied philosophy at the Gregorian University in Rome, Italy. Seminarian at the Theology Seminary of the Institute for Foreign Missions at Milan, Italy. Ordained on 19 May 1894 at Milan.

Missionary to Toungoo, Eastern Burma (modern Myanmar), setting sail on 27 September 1895. Worked in Burma until 1907 when his failing health forced his return to Italy. From there he spent the rest of his life encouraging clerical and lay missionaries through his writing, his work, his preaching. Director of Le Missioni Cattoliche in 1909. Started the publication of Propaganda Missionaria, a popular broadsheet newspaper, in 1914. Founded the Missionary Union of the Clergy in 1916, created with the idea of spreading missionary zeal throughout the faithful. Founded Italia Missionaria for young people in 1919. Founded Sacred Heart Seminary at Ducenta, Caserta, Italy in an effort to foster missionary vocations in southern Italy.

Superior General of the Institute of Foreign Missions of Milan in 1924 which in 1926 was joined by Pope Pius XI to the Missionary Seminary of Rome to create the Pontifical Institute for the Foreign Missions (P.I.M.E.). Worked from 1934 to 1936 for help found the Misssionary Sisters of the Immaculate, an offshoot of the P.I.M.I. Headed the International Secretariat for the Missionary Union of the Clergy from 1937 to 1941. Superior of the Italian Southern Province of P.I.M.E. in 1943. Publisher of the family missionary magazine Venga il tuo regno in 1943. Wrote in support of missionaries, developed techniques which have become standard today, and though he was tied to a desk in southern Italy, he worked as a missionary throughout his life.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

Readings

All the Church for all the World! – Blessed Paolo

We missionaries often wonder why the work of the conversion of the non-Christian world goes so slowly. We usually give various reasons to explain this painful fact, and in truth the problem may be considered from many angles, some of which do not concern our responsibility. But for the part that does concern us, and it is the main part, the problem has a very clear solution. To save the world, God in his infinite wisdom wanted to have co-workers. God does his part well: do the people called to help him do their part equally well? Let us work in such a way that the whole Church, all Christian people, led by their bishops and clergy, truly feel the apostolic duty that is incumbent upon them to promote the propagation of the faith with every means. Let us work in such a way that that missionaries, the most direct instruments for the conversion of souls, are saints, and non-Christians will not be slow to be converted. The missionary problem has been, and still is almost ignored by the Christian people. Those who were interested in the past were always a minority, and it is extremely painful to see today too, although some progress has been made, how the enormous question is far from being understood and faced fully by clergy and people. It is extremely painful, because Catholic peoples would have more than enough energies to promote the work of evangelization more worthily if priests taught, organised and above all inflamed them with a greater spirit of faith and zeal… Missionaries, also from the human viewpoint, have been excellent people…but neither brilliance nor prudence, nor courage have made them great in our eyes and the eyes of God. They have been great, they have saved many souls, they have founded Churches, mainly because they were holy men, that is, spiritual men. This is the secret, the soul of their zeal, their perseverance and their success; this is the solemn teaching they have handed down to us and which I love to remind you of, so that our missionaries of today and those of tomorrow may always build upon it the first and essential reason for their own sanctification and the sanctification of the souls that are, and will be entrusted to them. You, missionaries in active service in the field, are particularly concerned with your part of cooperation. Therefore I say to you: be holy missionaries by following the footsteps of those great missionaries who went before you and, for the part that concerns you, your apostolic duty will have been done to the full. The souls the Lord in his merciful designs has entrusted to each one of you that you may lead them to salvation, will be saved and at the end of your days you will be able to say with the Divine Redeemer: “(Father) I kept those you had given me true to you name. I have watched over them and not one is lost” (John 17:12).” Blessed Paolo

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Paolo Manna“. CatholicSaints.Info. 19 September 2017. Web. 22 October 2019. <>