Posts tagged ‘Saints who were Cooks’

Blessed Bonaventure of Barcelona

Blessed Bonaventure of BarcelonaAlso known as

  • Bonaventure of Riudoms
  • Bonaventura Gran
  • Fra Bonaventure of Barcelona
  • Miguel Baptista Gran Peris

Memorial

Profile

The only child in a farm family, Francisco married at age 18, but became a widower just sixteen months later. He then followed a call to religious life, and Franciscan friar at the convent of Sant Miquel d’Escornalbou, making his religious profession on 14 July 1641 and taking the name Bonaventura. Over the next 17 years, he was assigned to convents in Mora d’Ebre, Figueres, la Bisbal d’Empordà and Terrassa where he served variously as cook, porter, beggar and infirmarian, and was known for his quiet, pious devotion to work, prayer and Franciscan spirituality. In 1658 he was sent to the area of Rome, Italy, to promote a return to strict observance of the Franciscan Rule; he founded four monasteries in the region. He was assigned to houses in Aracaeli and Capranica, and served as porter at Saint Isidore’s College. In 1662 he founded the Riformella, a reform movement of retreats and spiritual meditation for his brother friars to bring them back to the original Franciscan spirituality; his writings about the “Retreats” received pontifical approve from Pope Innocent XI. Over the years he served as advisor to many, including Pope Alexander VII, Pope Clement IX, Pope Clement X and Pope Innocent XI.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Patronage

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Bonaventure of Barcelona“. CatholicSaints.Info. 11 September 2018. Web. 15 November 2019. <>

Saint Nazaria Ignacia March y Mesa

Saint Nazaria Ignacia March y MesaAlso known as

  • Nazaire de Sainte-Thérèse March Mesa
  • Nazaria Ignacia de Santa Teresa de Jesus

Memorial

Profile

Fourth of eighteen children born to José Alejandro March y Reus, a merchant, fisherman and industrial worker, and Nazaria Mesa Ramos; Nazaira had a twin sister, Ignazia, and ten brothers who survived infancy. She and her sister were baptized on the day they were born, Nazaria made her First Communion on 21 November 1898 and made a personal vow of consecration to God. Unlike many children who are drawn to religious life at an early age, her family was indifferent to the faith, and grew so tired of her of her devotions that they once “grounded” her from going to Mass. By the time she was confirmed on 15 March 1902, which was celebrated by Blessed Marcelo Spínola y Maestre, her family had grown used to her piety, and allowed her to join the Franciscan Third Order and more actively practice her faith. She succeeded in getting several of them to return to the Church.

In late 1904, business failures led the family to move to Mexico. On the trip, Nazarie met sisters in the Instituto de Hermanitas de los Ancianos Desamparados (Institute of Sisters of the Abandoned Elders), and was so inspired by their charism that on 7 December 1908 she followed a calling to religious life, and entered the Institute in Mexico City, Mexico; she made her perpetual vows on 1 January 1915, and took the name Sister Nazaire de Sainte-Thérèse. Her diaries of the time show a deep devotion to her calling, but struggles with her vows of obedience to her superiors.

She was assigned to the Institute hospice in Oruro, Bolivia where she worked as a cook, housekeeper, nurse and occasional beggar to support the poor and neglected for twelve years. The region around Oruro was not entirely Christian, many Protestant groups were establishing missions, and the few priests in the area were often lax or lived scandalous lives. Beginning in 1920 Sister Nazaire began to feel a call to found a new congregation devoted to missionary work, evanglization and religious education. On 18 January 1925, the feast of the Chair of Saint Peter, Sister Nazaire made a special vow of obedience to the Pope, and on Pentecost that year she made a vow to work for the union and extension of the Holy Catholic Church. On 16 June 1925, with six other sisters, she founded the Pontifical Crusade, later renamed the Congregation of the Missionary Crusaders of the Church, and began service as their superior. The mission of the Congregation was to catechize children and adults, support the work of priests, conduct missions, and to print and distribute short religious tracts.

Mother Nazaire met with opposition to her work, much of it from within Church administration. Her sisters in the Institute treated her as a traitor to her original vocation for turning away from their work; her superiors considered her disobedient, and some Claretian clergy considered her a glory-hound, ignoring all the help members of their order had given her. But Nazaire clung to Christ and pressed on.

Monsignor Felipe Cortesi, while in Bolivia, had worked to help Mother Nazaire to found the Congregation. When he was assigned to be the apostolic nuncio of Argentina in 1930, he asked had her open a Missionary Crusader house in Buenos Aires. The Congregation received an early test under fire during the 1932 to 1935 war between Bolivia and Paraguay; Mother Nazaire and the sisters cared for and brought the sacraments to soldiers on both sides, and helped establish homes for war orphans. In 1934 she founded the first magazine in Bolivia for women in religious life, Al Adalid de Cristo Rey, and the first female trade union, Sociedad de Obrera Católicas

In early 1934, Monsignor Cortesi asked the Vatican Congregation of Religious to approve the rules for the Crusaders that Nazaire had written, based on Ignatian spirituality. Later that year, Mother Nazaria travelled to Rome with an Argentinian pilgrimage group to work for the approval of her Rule. She made pilgrimages to several sites, and had a private audience with Pope Pius XI during which Nazaire said that she was willing to die for the Church; the Pope told her that she must, instead, live and work for the Church.

Leaving Italy for her native Spain, Mother Nazaire founded a retreat center for spiritual exercises in Madrid under the flag of Uruguay; the sisters there survived the Spanish Civil War as Franco did not wish to risk the international incident killing them would cause. With the help of the Bolivian government, Mother Nazaria was able to leave the persecutions in Spain and return to the Americas. She summoned a general chapter of the Congregation in 1937 to strengthen the unity and zeal of her sisters. Worked on the spiritual formation of new sisters, and set an example by her pious, simple life. To the superiors of the Congregation houses she always recommended a maternal approach to the sisters in their care, to remember their role as Mother of the house. When the Spanish Civil War ended, Nazaire returned to Spain to check on the sisters she had left behind, then returned to the Americas for the final time. The Congregation spread throughout South America and began to work in Portugal, Spain, France, Italy and Camaroon. Though Nazaire did not live to see it, the Congregation received Vatican recognition on 9 June 1947 by Pope Pius XII.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Canonized

Patronage

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Nazaria Ignacia March y Mesa“. CatholicSaints.Info. 1 February 2019. Web. 15 November 2019. <>

Blessed Sylvester Ventura

Also known as

  • Sylvester of Valdisive

Memorial

Profile

At age 40 he joined the Camaldolese monks at the convent of Santa Maria degli in Florence, Italy where he served as a cook. Received a series of visions, and when he got behind in the kitchen, angels would come to help. Much in demand as a spiritual advisor.

Born

Died

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Sylvester Ventura“. CatholicSaints.Info. 16 July 2016. Web. 15 November 2019. <>

Blessed Mariano of Roccacasale

Blessed Mariano of RoccacasaleAlso known as

  • Cicchetti (childhood nickname; means “snack size” or “little bit”)
  • Domenico di Nicolantonio
  • Marianus

Memorial

Profile

Born to a poor but pious farm family, he worked as a shepherd on Mount Morrone until the age of 23. Joined the Franciscans in 1802 at the convent of Saint Nicholas in Arischia, Italy as a lay brother; he served as cook, gardener, woodworker and alms beggar for 12 years. Friar Minor at the Franciscan convent in Bellegra, Italy, outside Rome, in 1815. There he served over 50 years as porter, dispensing charity and aid to pilgrims and the poor. Known for great devotion to Our Lady, for his devotion to Eucharistic Adoration, and his complete poverty and disregard of worldly concerns for himself. With little education but much time in prayer, he became a spritual advisor to many.

Born

Died

  • 31 May 1866 in Bellegra (a.k.a. Civitella), Rome, Italy of natural causes

Veneration

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Mariano of Roccacasale“. CatholicSaints.Info. 6 August 2018. Web. 15 November 2019. <>

Blessed Ulrika Fransiska Nisch

Blessed Ulrika Fransiska NischAlso known as

  • Fransiska Dettenrieder

Memorial

Profile

Oldest of eleven children born to Ulrich Nisch, who cleaned stables, and Klothilde Dettenrieder, a servant in a village inn. The couple was so poor that their families and the local authorities refused to allow their marriage; they forced the issue with the birth of Fransiska. The baby was baptized at the age of one day. Only four Fransiska’s siblings reached adulthood.

Fransiska spent her early childhood in Oberdorf, Germany, raised by her grandmother and maternal aunt, Gertrud Dettenrieder. When she was returned to her parents at age seven, she had so much trouble fitting in that she eventually returned to Oberdorf to live with her aunt and finish school. Known as a pious child, Fransiska early felt a call to religious life, but beginning in 1894 she worked as a maid in serveral homes to support her family. She made her First Communion on 21 April 1895, and was confirmed later that year. In 1898 she worked at a general store and cheese factory in Sauggart, Germany. Worked at a combination bakery, brewer and tavern in Biberach, Germany in 1899. Servant in the house of a teacher in Rorschach, Switzerland in 1901.

In 1903 she began suffering from a severe form of erysipelas in 1903; in hospital she was treated by the Sisters of Charity of Holy Cross, and was so impressed by them that she followed her call to religious vocation by joining the Sisters on 17 October 1904 at the Hegne monastery in Konstanz, Germany, taking the name Ulrika in honour of her father. She spent her few remaining years working in the kitchens of several houses in her Order amd dealing with a series of deep mystical experiences.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Ulrika Fransiska Nisch“. CatholicSaints.Info. 6 September 2018. Web. 15 November 2019. <>

Blessed Benvenuto Mareni

Also known as

  • Benventuto of Recanati
  • Benevenutus…
  • Benvenutus…

Memorial

Profile

13th-century Franciscan Conventual lay brother in Recanati, Italy. Worked at his monastery as a cook, and spent his free time in prayer. During prayer and Mass he would lapse into ecstacies and receive visions; during one vision he was allowed to hold the Infant Christ. Legend says that once when a trance lasted so long that he was late to his work in the kitchen, he found an angel there already cooking.

Born

Died

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Benvenuto Mareni“. CatholicSaints.Info. 5 May 2017. Web. 15 November 2019. <>

Blessed Francisca de Amézua Ibaibarriaga

Blessed Francisca de Amézua IbaibarriagaAlso known as

  • Sister Francisca of Saint Teresa

Memorial

Profile

Raised in a pious Christian household. Member of the Carmelite Sisters of Charity, beginning her novitiate on 16 October 1900 in Vitoria, Spain. Served as a cook at the College of Oliva in Valencia, Spain. Served as a cook at the College of the Immaculate Conception of Cullera, Spain. Martyred in the Spanish Civil War.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Francisca de Amézua Ibaibarriaga“. CatholicSaints.Info. 19 August 2016. Web. 15 November 2019. <>

Blessed Davíd Carlos-Marañon

Also known as

  • Davíd of the Blessed Sacrament
  • David Carlos

Memorial

Profile

Born to a wealthy family, the son of Domenico Carlos and Gregoria Marañon. Served in the military. He then disappointed his family by following a call to religious life, becoming a Piarist lay brother in Estella, Spain on 4 June 1931, and making his solemn profession on 28 June 1935. Served as gardener and cook for his community. In the persecutions of the Spanish Civil War, priests were automatically murdered, but David was given a chance to live if he would renounce religious life and throw away his habit; he refused. Martyr.

Born

Died

  • shot on 28 July 1936 on the road near Purroy de la Solana, Huesca, Spain
  • body burned by his killers

Venerable

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Davíd Carlos-Marañon“. CatholicSaints.Info. 1 September 2017. Web. 15 November 2019. <>

Blessed Benito Solana Ruiz

Blessed Benito Solana RuizAlso known as

  • Benito of the Virgin of Villar

Memorial

Profile

Son of a village carpenter. Against his parent’s wishes, Benito entered the Passionist novitiate in Corella, Spain in 1913. He was not a great student, had trouble with the early studies at seminary, and became a brother in the Order. Cook and tailor for the Passionist house in Daimiel, Spain. Tailor and porter of a house in Santa Clara, Cuba in 1919. Assigned to Tacubaya, Mexico in 1922 but was recalled to Daimiel when antiCatholic persecutions began in Mexico. Nurse and tailor in Zaragoza, Spain. Suffered from rheumatism. Known for his patience, humility and charity, especially with sick people. Martyred in the Spanish Civil War.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Benito Solana Ruiz“. CatholicSaints.Info. 4 April 2018. Web. 15 November 2019. <>

Blessed Simón Miguel Rodríguez

Memorial

Profile

Franciscan lay brother at the college in Chipiona. Friar Minor, taking the name Simón Miguel and making his solemn vows on 26 June 1935 in the convent of Fuenteobejuna where he served as a cook until martyred in the Spanish Civil War.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Simón Miguel Rodríguez“. CatholicSaints.Info. 23 September 2016. Web. 15 November 2019. <>