Posts tagged ‘Saints who had Tuberculosis’

Venerable Arcangelo Biasi

Venerable Arcangelo BiasiAlso known as

  • Fra Girolamo Maria

Profile

One of several sons born to a poor village family, Arcangelo was baptized at the age of one day. At the age of 12, he began to feel drawn to religious life, and on 4 October 1915 he joined the Franciscans, taking the name Fra Girolamo Maria. During World War I, Fra Girolamo studied at the International Seraphic College in Rome, Italy. Close friend of and trusted co-worker with Saint Maximilian Kolbe. Helped to found the Militia of the Immaculate.

Arcangelo contracted tuberculosis, which interrupted his studies, but he managed to be ordained a priest in Padua, Italy on 16 July 1922. His disease was debilitating, and he spent the remaining seven years of his life in and out of various hospitals, rarely able to work in the outside world, ministering to other patients, and praying for the work of his brother friars.

Born

Died

Venerated

MLA Citation

  • “Venerable Arcangelo Biasi“. CatholicSaints.Info. 9 January 2019. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Blessed Richard Henkes

Blessed Richard HenkesMemorial

Profile

One of eight children in the family of a stone mason. His mother taught the children religion, and would sprinkle them with holy water each night before bed. Attracted to the idea of mission work, Richard joined the Pallotines in 1919. Spiritual student of the Servant of God Joseph Kentenich. Ordained to the priesthood on 6 June 1925 in the diocese of Limburg, Germany. Teacher in several Pallottine and Schoenstatt schools beginning in 1926. In 1927 he diagnosed with tuburculosis, and collapsed from exhaustion; there was thought to transfer him to South Africa for his health, but he was considered too sick to surive such a trip. By 1928 he was somewhat recovered, and insisted on resuming teaching. In 1931 he was assigned to schools in Upper Silesia.

A skilled and popular preacher and retreat leader, Richard was known for condemning the ideology and actions of the Nazis, especially the murder of disabled people and others considered an unproductive burden on society. He was arrested for this on 7 March 1937 in Roppach, Germany, but was warned and released. Father Richard became an indirect collaborator with the Resistance, and spoke so forcefully and so often against the Nazis that his superiors began to worry that the Nazis would retaliate against the school where Richard taught. He was arrested again on 8 April 1943 in Branitz, Germany for making political statements, and was imprisoned first at Ratibor, Germany, and then in the Dachau concentration camp where he was forced to do manual labour for the SS, and where he would remain the rest of his life. He became friends with fellow prisoner and future Cardinal, Josef Beran, who taught Father Richard the Czech language so he could help minister to imprisoned Czechs. When typhoid broke out in the camp, Father Richard volunteer to minister to the sick until he contracted the illness himself. Martyr.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Richard Henkes“. CatholicSaints.Info. 9 January 2019. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Blessed Eugénie Joubert

Blessed Eugénie JoubertMemorial

Profile

Fourth of eight children born to wine-makers Pietro Joubert and Antonia Celle; she was baptized on the day she was born. Educated at the Ursuline boarding school at Ministrel, France from 1881 till 1887, and then at the College of Saint Mary in Le Puy, France, run by the Sisters of Notre Dame, from 1889 to 1892. Made her First Communion on 29 May 1887. Taught catechism to local children. She joined the Sisters of the Holy Family of the Sacred Heart at Aubervilliers, France at age 19 on 6 October 1895, and made her profession on 8 December 1897. Assigned to be a catechist in Aubervilliers where she worked with poor children to prepare them for their First Communion. Sister Eugenie contracted tuberculosis in 1902. Assigned to Rome, Italy, then moved to Belgium in May 1904, but died soon after. She was known for a great devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, and for boundless care for the children in her charge.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

Readings

“Jesus … Jesus … Jesus” – Blessed Eugénie’s dying words

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Eugénie Joubert“. CatholicSaints.Info. 1 February 2019. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Blessed Giuseppina Catanea

detail of a portrait of Blessed Giuseppina Catanea, date and artist unknown; photographed on 12 February 2012; swiped from Wikimedia CommonsAlso known as

  • Pinella (childhood nickname in her family)
  • Sister Maria Giuseppina of Jesus Crucified
  • Marie-Joséphine de Jésus crucifié

Memorial

Profile

Born to the Italian nobility, Giuseppina was known as a pious girl with great care for the poor, a devotion to Mary and the Eucharist, and for praying her rosary whenever she had a chance. She developed the heart condition angina pectoris in 1912, later contracted spinal tuberculosis, and was eventually confined to a wheelchair. Against her family’s objections, she joined the Carmelites on 10 March 1918. Following a pair of visions of Saint Francis Xavier, Giuseppina was miraculously cured on 26 June 1922; word leaked out and people from all over the region came to learn from her. In 1932 she received approval from Pope Pius XI to found a cloistered house of Discalced Carmelites; she took the name Sister Maria Giuseppina of Jesus Crucified and made her solemn profession on 6 August 1932. Sub-prioress in 1934. In 1943 she developed multiple sclerosis, began to lose her sight, and in 1944 was again confined to a wheelchair. As intructed by her spiritual director, she began writing an autobiography and spiritual journal for the benefit of the sisters who might learn from her. Chosen vicar in early 1945, and then prioress on 29 September 1945, a position she held the rest of her life.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Giuseppina Catanea“. CatholicSaints.Info. 10 November 2019. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Saint Nazaria Ignacia March y Mesa

Saint Nazaria Ignacia March y MesaAlso known as

  • Nazaire de Sainte-Thérèse March Mesa
  • Nazaria Ignacia de Santa Teresa de Jesus

Memorial

Profile

Fourth of eighteen children born to José Alejandro March y Reus, a merchant, fisherman and industrial worker, and Nazaria Mesa Ramos; Nazaira had a twin sister, Ignazia, and ten brothers who survived infancy. She and her sister were baptized on the day they were born, Nazaria made her First Communion on 21 November 1898 and made a personal vow of consecration to God. Unlike many children who are drawn to religious life at an early age, her family was indifferent to the faith, and grew so tired of her of her devotions that they once “grounded” her from going to Mass. By the time she was confirmed on 15 March 1902, which was celebrated by Blessed Marcelo Spínola y Maestre, her family had grown used to her piety, and allowed her to join the Franciscan Third Order and more actively practice her faith. She succeeded in getting several of them to return to the Church.

In late 1904, business failures led the family to move to Mexico. On the trip, Nazarie met sisters in the Instituto de Hermanitas de los Ancianos Desamparados (Institute of Sisters of the Abandoned Elders), and was so inspired by their charism that on 7 December 1908 she followed a calling to religious life, and entered the Institute in Mexico City, Mexico; she made her perpetual vows on 1 January 1915, and took the name Sister Nazaire de Sainte-Thérèse. Her diaries of the time show a deep devotion to her calling, but struggles with her vows of obedience to her superiors.

She was assigned to the Institute hospice in Oruro, Bolivia where she worked as a cook, housekeeper, nurse and occasional beggar to support the poor and neglected for twelve years. The region around Oruro was not entirely Christian, many Protestant groups were establishing missions, and the few priests in the area were often lax or lived scandalous lives. Beginning in 1920 Sister Nazaire began to feel a call to found a new congregation devoted to missionary work, evanglization and religious education. On 18 January 1925, the feast of the Chair of Saint Peter, Sister Nazaire made a special vow of obedience to the Pope, and on Pentecost that year she made a vow to work for the union and extension of the Holy Catholic Church. On 16 June 1925, with six other sisters, she founded the Pontifical Crusade, later renamed the Congregation of the Missionary Crusaders of the Church, and began service as their superior. The mission of the Congregation was to catechize children and adults, support the work of priests, conduct missions, and to print and distribute short religious tracts.

Mother Nazaire met with opposition to her work, much of it from within Church administration. Her sisters in the Institute treated her as a traitor to her original vocation for turning away from their work; her superiors considered her disobedient, and some Claretian clergy considered her a glory-hound, ignoring all the help members of their order had given her. But Nazaire clung to Christ and pressed on.

Monsignor Felipe Cortesi, while in Bolivia, had worked to help Mother Nazaire to found the Congregation. When he was assigned to be the apostolic nuncio of Argentina in 1930, he asked had her open a Missionary Crusader house in Buenos Aires. The Congregation received an early test under fire during the 1932 to 1935 war between Bolivia and Paraguay; Mother Nazaire and the sisters cared for and brought the sacraments to soldiers on both sides, and helped establish homes for war orphans. In 1934 she founded the first magazine in Bolivia for women in religious life, Al Adalid de Cristo Rey, and the first female trade union, Sociedad de Obrera Católicas

In early 1934, Monsignor Cortesi asked the Vatican Congregation of Religious to approve the rules for the Crusaders that Nazaire had written, based on Ignatian spirituality. Later that year, Mother Nazaria travelled to Rome with an Argentinian pilgrimage group to work for the approval of her Rule. She made pilgrimages to several sites, and had a private audience with Pope Pius XI during which Nazaire said that she was willing to die for the Church; the Pope told her that she must, instead, live and work for the Church.

Leaving Italy for her native Spain, Mother Nazaire founded a retreat center for spiritual exercises in Madrid under the flag of Uruguay; the sisters there survived the Spanish Civil War as Franco did not wish to risk the international incident killing them would cause. With the help of the Bolivian government, Mother Nazaria was able to leave the persecutions in Spain and return to the Americas. She summoned a general chapter of the Congregation in 1937 to strengthen the unity and zeal of her sisters. Worked on the spiritual formation of new sisters, and set an example by her pious, simple life. To the superiors of the Congregation houses she always recommended a maternal approach to the sisters in their care, to remember their role as Mother of the house. When the Spanish Civil War ended, Nazaire returned to Spain to check on the sisters she had left behind, then returned to the Americas for the final time. The Congregation spread throughout South America and began to work in Portugal, Spain, France, Italy and Camaroon. Though Nazaire did not live to see it, the Congregation received Vatican recognition on 9 June 1947 by Pope Pius XII.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Canonized

Patronage

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Nazaria Ignacia March y Mesa“. CatholicSaints.Info. 1 February 2019. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Blessed Augustus Czartoryski

Blessed Augustus Czartoryski, date, location and photographer unknown; swiped from Santi e BeatiAlso known as

  • Prince August Franciszek Maria Anna Józef Kajetan Czartoryski
  • Duke of Vista Alegre

Memorial

Profile

Oldest child of Prince Ladislaus and Princess Maria Amparo, daughter of the Queen of Spain; the couple had settled in Paris, France after being losing all their property and being exiled in the 1830 revolution. Both Augustus and his mother contracted tuberculosis; she died when he was six years old, and he was sent to doctors in Switzerland, Italy, Spain and Egypt in a vain search for a cure. Though he was forced to attend court functions and amusements as the son of a prince, the boy had no interest in worldly life, and early felt a call to religious vocation. He studied in Paris and in Krakow, Poland, but school was often interrupted due to his poor health; one of his tutors was Saint Jozef Kalinowski.

The turning point in the young man’s life came in May 1883 when he met Saint John Bosco. Don Bosco celebrated Mass in the family chapel of Lambert Palace in Paris, and Augustus served as a 25 year old altar boy. After making all needed arrangements to turn his rights, privileges and inheritance as the first-born to his brothers, Augustus joined the Salesian Congregation in June 1887; Don Bosco was reluctant as he did not think Augustus’s health could withstand the life of a novice and seminarian, but Pope Leo XIII intervened and convinced him. Augustus studied in Turin, Italy, received his cassock on 24 November 1887, and in early 1888 made his Salesian vows at the grave of Don Bosco. After studying in Liguria, Italy, where he became close friends with Venerable Andrea Beltrami, he was ordained a priest at Sanremo, diocese of Ventimiglia, Italy on 2 April 1892 by Blessed Tommaso Reggio. He served as a parish priest in Alassio, Savona, in the diocese of Albenga, Italy for about a year before the tuberculosis did him in.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Augustus Czartoryski“. CatholicSaints.Info. 25 January 2019. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Blessed Ulrika Fransiska Nisch

Blessed Ulrika Fransiska NischAlso known as

  • Fransiska Dettenrieder

Memorial

Profile

Oldest of eleven children born to Ulrich Nisch, who cleaned stables, and Klothilde Dettenrieder, a servant in a village inn. The couple was so poor that their families and the local authorities refused to allow their marriage; they forced the issue with the birth of Fransiska. The baby was baptized at the age of one day. Only four Fransiska’s siblings reached adulthood.

Fransiska spent her early childhood in Oberdorf, Germany, raised by her grandmother and maternal aunt, Gertrud Dettenrieder. When she was returned to her parents at age seven, she had so much trouble fitting in that she eventually returned to Oberdorf to live with her aunt and finish school. Known as a pious child, Fransiska early felt a call to religious life, but beginning in 1894 she worked as a maid in serveral homes to support her family. She made her First Communion on 21 April 1895, and was confirmed later that year. In 1898 she worked at a general store and cheese factory in Sauggart, Germany. Worked at a combination bakery, brewer and tavern in Biberach, Germany in 1899. Servant in the house of a teacher in Rorschach, Switzerland in 1901.

In 1903 she began suffering from a severe form of erysipelas in 1903; in hospital she was treated by the Sisters of Charity of Holy Cross, and was so impressed by them that she followed her call to religious vocation by joining the Sisters on 17 October 1904 at the Hegne monastery in Konstanz, Germany, taking the name Ulrika in honour of her father. She spent her few remaining years working in the kitchens of several houses in her Order amd dealing with a series of deep mystical experiences.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Ulrika Fransiska Nisch“. CatholicSaints.Info. 6 September 2018. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Blessed Enrichetta Alfieri

Blessed Enrichetta AlfieriAlso known as

  • Sister Maria Angela
  • Henrietta Alfieri
  • prisoner 3209
  • Mother of San Vittore
  • Angel of San Vittore
  • La Mamma di San Vittore

Memorial

Profile

From childhood Enrichetta felt a call to religious life, and joined the Sisters of Charity of Saint Joan Antida Thouret on 20 December 1911. She worked as a kindergarten teacher in Vercelli, Italy, but was forced to quit when she developed Pott’s disease, a form of tuberculosis of the spine, in 1917. On 25 February 1923 she was miraculously cured by a pilgrimage to Lourdes, France through the intercession of Mary Immaculate.

She recovered so completely that on 24 May 1923 Sisters Maria Angela was assigned to prison ministry at San Vittore Prison in Milan, Italy. Her work with the prisoners was a great success, and she became known as the Mother and Angel of San Vittore, and was named the superior of the Sisters there in 1939.

She was there when it became an SS headquarters and prison for Jews, priests, nuns and resistance workers who were fighting the Axis powers of World War II. She and the Sisters helped them by smuggling in supplies, smuggling out messages and working with Church authorities to intervene for the prisoners, saving many in the process. On 23 September 1944 a message from a prisoner was intercepted that was director to Enrichetta, and she was arrested for spying and sentenced to death or imprisonment in Germany. Church officials, including Blessed Alfredo Ildefonso Schuster, Archbishop of Milan, intervened for her, and she was transferred to the Sisters‘ house in Brescia, Italy where she wrote a memoir of her imprisonment. On 7 May 1945, at the end of the war, she was re-assigned to the San Vittore where she administered to prisoners of war – including the former jailers.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Enrichetta Alfieri“. CatholicSaints.Info. 22 November 2015. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Venerable Bernardo Vaz Lobo Teixeira de Vasconcelos

Venerable Bernardo Vaz Lobo Teixeira de VasconcelosAlso known as

  • Bernardo of the Assumption
  • Bernardo da Anunciada

Profile

Studied at the University of Coimbra, Portugal. Member of the Saint Vincent de Paul Society. Devoted to eucharistic adoration. Editor of a journal devoted to democracy. Discerning a call to religious life, he entered the Mosteiro de Singeverga on 16 August 1924, joined Benedictine Annunciation Congregation, and made his vows on 29 September 1925, taking the name Brother Bernardo da Anunciada. Sent to the Abbey of Mont-César in Belgium to study theology, he soon had to return home, having contracted tuberculosis. Poet. Wrote Cântico de Amor.

Born

Died

Venerated

MLA Citation

  • “Venerable Bernardo Vaz Lobo Teixeira de Vasconcelos“. CatholicSaints.Info. 25 November 2016. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Venerable Honora Nagle

Venerable Nano NagleAlso known as

  • Nano Nagle
  • Mary of Saint John of God
  • Lady with the Lantern

Profile

The eldest of six children born to a wealthy family during the period of the Irish penal laws which limited denied many freedoms and rights to the Irish. She started a school and became a teacher in Cork, Ireland when teaching for Irish Catholic poor violated the English colonial policy. She dedicated herself to the better education of the poor and founded the Union of Presentation Sisters of the Blessed Virgin Mary on 24 December 1775 to further that mission; 1200 sisters continue the mission today.

Born

Died

Venerated

MLA Citation

  • “Venerable Honora Nagle“. CatholicSaints.Info. 15 August 2018. Web. 13 November 2019. <>