Posts tagged ‘Emblem Water’

Saint Magino of Tarragona

decorated tiles with the portrait of Saint Maginus of Tarragona, in Passatge de la Vall, Sitges, Catalonia, Spain; photographed on 1 December 2013 by Jordiferrer; swiped from Wikimedia CommonsAlso known as

  • Magi
  • Magin
  • Maginus

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Profile

Born to the Gallic nobility of Burgundy (in modern France), he was orphaned at an early age. Hermit on Mount Brufagaña for 30 years. Had the gift of healing by prayer, which he did for the governor of Tarragona, Spain. Imprisoned, tortured and martyred in the persecutions of Diocletian.

Died

Canonized

Patronage

Representation

  • using his staff to cause springs to erupt from the ground
Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Magino of Tarragona“. CatholicSaints.Info. 13 January 2018. Web. 14 December 2018. <>

Saint Servatus of Tongres

detail from a Saint Servatus holy card, Antwerp, 1917, artist unknownAlso known as

  • Servaas
  • Servatius
  • Servais

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Bishop of Tongres (in the modern Belgium) for 37 years. Welcomed Saint Athanasius of Alexandria during his exile by the Arians. Worked to remove heretical bishop of Cologne, Germany in 346. Active at the Council of Rimini in 359. Prophesied the mid-5th century invasion of Gaul by the Huns.

Born

Died

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Representation

  • bishop holding a key and accompanied by an angel meeting burghers at a city gate
  • bishop holding a key in one hand while placing his crozier on a dragon
  • bishop reading desk where nearby sits a shield with three wooden shoes
  • bishop with three wooden shoes
  • man striking water with a staff
  • pilgrim sleeping in the sun while an eagle fans him

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Servatus of Tongres“. CatholicSaints.Info. 22 May 2017. Web. 14 December 2018. <>

Saint Bertulph

Also known as

  • Bertulf
  • Bertulphe
  • Bertoul
  • Bertou
  • Bertulphus

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Convert as a young man in Flanders, Belgium. Managed a farm in Renty, France for Count Wambert for several years. Pilgrim to Rome, Italy. Parish priest in Renty. Founded and led a monastery nearby until his death.

Born

Died

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Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Bertulph“. CatholicSaints.Info. 1 September 2012. Web. 14 December 2018. <>

Saint Theonas of Egypt

image courtesy of the Digital Image Archive, Pitts Theology Library, Candler School of Theology, Emory UniversityMemorial

Profile

Monk at Theibaid, Egypt and el-Bahnasa, Egypt.

Died

Canonized

Representation

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Theonas of Egypt“. CatholicSaints.Info. 22 May 2012. Web. 14 December 2018. <>

Saint William Firmatus

Also known as

  • William Firmatus of Tours

Memorial

Profile

Canon and physician at Saint-Venance. Because of a divine warning against avarice, William gave all his possessions to the poor and spent the rest of his life on pilgrimages and as a hermit at Savigny and Mantilly. Known for his closeness to nature, his love of wildlife, and the unusual communication he seemed to have with animals. Legend says that at Dardenay during a drought, he saved the people by striking the ground with his pilgrim‘s staff, causing a spring of water to appear.

Died

  • 1103 of natural causes

Patronage

Representation

  • man thrusting his arm into a fire
  • man with a raven that showing him the way to the Promised Land
Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint William Firmatus“. CatholicSaints.Info. 24 April 2017. Web. 14 December 2018. <>

Saint Narcissus of Jerusalem

detail of a stained glass window of Saint Narcissus of Jerusalem; Didron of Paris, c.1875; Church of Saint-Barthélémy in Bénévent-l'Abbaye, Creuse, Nouvelle-Aquitaine, France; photographed on 13 April 2018 by GFreihalter; swiped from Wikimedia CommonsMemorial

Profile

Bishop of Jerusalem, consecrated c.180 when he was already an old man. Late in life, he was accused of a crime. None of the Christians in his diocese believed it, but Narcissus did not believe he should serve after being under such a cloud, and he became a desert hermit. After a complete acquittal, Narcissus returned to his see, older, weathered, but stronger and more zealous than ever, and served several more years. One Holy Saturday he turned water into lamp oil so the Easter vigil services could be conducted. When his age began to wear on him, Narcissus begged God to send a bishop to help him. Saint Alexander of Cappadocia responded, and the two ruled the diocese together, Narcissus living to age 116.

Born

Died

  • 215 of natural causes

Canonized

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Representation

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Narcissus of Jerusalem“. CatholicSaints.Info. 7 December 2018. Web. 14 December 2018. <>

Saint Ursus of Aosta

Saint Ursus of AostaAlso known as

  • Orso
  • Ours

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Evangelized the area of Digne, France. Fought Arianism. Archdeacon under Bishop Jucundus of Aosta, Italy. When the Arian Ploziano became bishop of Aosta, Ursus and several other canons relocated to the church of Saint Peter just outside Aosta; the site is now known as Sant’ Orso, the church is the collegiate church of Saint Peter and Saint Ursus.

Born

Died

Canonized

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Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Ursus of Aosta“. CatholicSaints.Info. 31 January 2017. Web. 14 December 2018. <>

Saint Guénhaël

detail of a stained glass window of Saint Gwehael; 1878, artist unknown; Cathedral of Saint Peter, Morbihan, France; taken on 28 December 2012 by Fab5669; swiped off Wikimedia CommonsAlso known as

  • Guenaël
  • Guenaud
  • Guénault
  • Guennal
  • Guinal
  • Gwenael
  • Gwendal
  • Gwenhael

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Son of a Breton chieftain. Educated at Landevennec, Brittany (in modern France under Saint Winwaloe in 489. Monk at Landevennec. Abbot of Landevennec in 532. Missionary to Britain and Ireland where he abolished the last pagan customs. Helped establish Cornouailles in Brittany in 546.

Born

Died

Canonized

Patronage

Representation

  • causing a spring to gush forth
Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Guénhaël“. CatholicSaints.Info. 12 June 2018. Web. 14 December 2018. <>

Saint Columbanus

detail of a 19th century stained glass window of Saint Columban, date unknown, artist unknown; Bobbio Abbey, Piacenza, Emilia-Romagna, Italy; swiped from Wikimedia CommonsAlso known as

  • Columbanus of Luxeuil
  • Columbanus of Bobbio
  • Columba of….
  • Columban of….

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Well-born, handsome and educated, Columbanus was torn between a desire for God and easy access to the pleasures of the world. Acting on advice of a holy anchoress, he decided to withdraw from the world. His family opposed the choice, his mother going so far as to block the door. Monk at Lough Erne. He studied Scripture extensively, and wrote a commentary on the Psalms. Monk at Bangor under abbot Saint Comgall.

In middle age, Columbanus felt a call to missionary life. With twelve companions (Saint Attala, Columbanus the Younger, Cummain, Domgal, Eogain, Eunan, Saint Gall, Gurgano, Libran, Lua, Sigisbert and Waldoleno) he travelled to Scotland, England, and then to France in 585. The area, though nominally Christian, had fallen far from the faith, but were ready for missionaries, and they had some success. They were warmly greeted at the court of Gontram, and king of Burgundy invited the band to stay. They chose the half-ruined Roman fortress of Annegray in the Vosges Mountains for their new home with Columbanus as their abbot.

The simple lives and obvious holiness of the group drew disciples to join them, and the sick to be healed by their prayers. Columbanus, to find solitude for prayer, often lived for long periods in a cave seven miles from the monastery, using a messenger to stay in touch with his brothers. When the number of new monks over-crowded the old fortress, King Gontram gave them the old castle of Luxeuil to found a new house in 590. Soon after, a third house was founded at Fontaines. Columbanus served as master of them all, and wrote a Rule for them; it incorporated many Celtic practices, was approved by the Council of Macon in 627, but was superseded by the Benedictine.

Problems arose early in the 7th century. Many Frankish bishops objected to a foreign missionary with so much influence, to the Celtic practices he brought, especially those related to Easter, and his independence from them. In 602 he was summoned to appear before them for judgment; instead of appearing, he sent a letter advising them to hold more synods, and to concern themselves with more important things than which rite he used to celebrate Easter. The dispute over Easter continued to years, with Columbanus appealing to multiple popes for help, but was only settled with Columbanus abandoned the Celtic calender when he moved to Italy.

In addition to his problems with the bishops, Columbanus spoke out against vice and corruption in the royal household and court, which was in the midst of a series of complex power grabs. Brunehault stirred up the bishops and nobilty against the abbot; Thierry ordered him to conform to the local ways, and shut up. Columbanus refused, and was briefly imprisoned at Besançon, but he escaped and returned to Luxeuil. Thierry and Brunehault sent an armed force to force him and his foreign monks back to Ireland. As soon as his ship set sail, a storm drove them back to shore; the captain took it as a sign, and set the monks free.

They made their way to King Clothaire at Soissons, Neustria and then the court of King Theodebert of Austrasia in 611. He travelled to Metz, France, then Mainz, Germany, Suevi, Alamanni, and finally Lake Zurich. Their evangelization work there was unsuccessful, and the group passed on to Arbon, then Bregenz, and then Lake Constance. Saint Gall, who knew the local language best, took the lead in this region; many were converted to the faith, and the group founded a new monastery as their home and base. However, a year later political upheaval caused Columbanus to cross the Alps into Italy, arriving in Milan in 612. The Christian royal family treated him well, and he preached and wrote against Arianism and Nestorianism. In gratitude, the Lombard king gave him a tract of land call Bobbio between Milan and Genoa in Italy. There he rebuilt a half-ruined church of Saint Peter, and around it he founded an abbey that was to be the source for evangelization throughout northern Italy for centuries to come.

Columbanus always enjoyed being in the forests and caves, and as he walked through the woods, birds and squirrels would ride on his shoulders. Toward the end of his life came word that his old enemies were dead, and his brothers wanted him to come back north, but he declined. Knowing that his time was almost done, he retired to a cave for solitude, and died as he had predicted. His influence continued for centuries as those he converted handed on the faith, the brothers he taught evanglized untold numbers more, and his brother monks founded over one hundred monasteries to protect learning and spread the faith.

Miracles ascribed to Columbanus include

  • to obtain food for a sick brother monk, he cured the wife of the donor
  • once when he was surrounded by wolves, he simply walked through them
  • at one point he needed a cave for his solitary prayers; a bear lived there; when Columbanus asked, the bear left
  • when he needed water in order to live in the cave, a spring appeared nearby
  • when the Luxeuil Abbey granary ran empty, Columbanus prayed over it and it refilled
  • he multiplied bread and beer for his community
  • he cured several sick monks, who then got straight out of bed to reap the monastery‘s harvest
  • gave sight to a blind man at Orleans
  • he destroyed a vat of beer being prepared for a pagan festival by breathing on it
  • when the monastery needed help in the fields, he tamed a bear, and yoked it to a plough

Born

Died

Canonized

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Representation

Storefront

Works

  • Penitencial
  • Seventeen short Sermons
  • Six Epistles
  • Latin Poems
  • A Monastic Rule

Readings

A man more holy, more chaste, more self-denying, a man with loftier aims and purer heart than Columbanus was never born in the Island of Saints. Archbishop Healy

All we Irish dwelling on the edge of the world are disciples of Saints Peter and Paul and of the disciples who, under the Holy Spirit, wrote the Sacred Canon. We accept nothing outside this evangelical and apostolic teaching. There was no heretic, no Jew, no schismatic, but the Catholic Faith, as first delivered to us by you, the successor of the apostles, is kept unshaken…. We, indeed, are, as I have said, chained to the Chair of Saint Peter; for although Rome is great and known afar, it is great and honored with us only by this Chair. Saint Columbanus

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Columbanus“. CatholicSaints.Info. 17 September 2018. Web. 14 December 2018. <>

Saint Fursey of Péronne

detail of an illustration of Saint Fursey of Péronne from a 16th century French 'Lives of the Saints' published in Paris, France; Richard de Montbaston et collaborateurs; swiped from Wikimedia CommonsAlso known as

  • Fursey of Lagny
  • Fursa
  • Furseo
  • Furse
  • Fursae
  • Fursu
  • Fulsey
  • Furseus

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Son of an Irish prince. Related to Saint Foillan and Saint Ultan of Péronne. Educated by Saint Brendan the Voyager. Priest. Abbot of a house at Rathmat, Ireland. Preached, evangelized, and established monasteries in Ireland for twelve years. Evangelized in England, building monasteries. Evangelized in France, working with Saint Blitharius; they had great success. Clovis, king of the Franks, received him, and asked that he build a house at Lagny, France. Raised the young son of a court nobleman from the dead. Given to ecstacies and trances during which he received visions of a immense struggle between good and evil, with glimpses of heaven and hell. The visions were described in the aptly named Visions of Fursey, and had a great effect on such works as Dante’s Divine Comedy. Bede wrote extensively and glowingly of Fursey. His image is on the banner of the city of Peronne, France.

Born

Died

Canonized

Patronage

Representation

  • abbot raising a young nobleman from the dead
  • abbot in an ecstastic trance
  • priest in a trance with spectral images hovering nearby
  • man with two oxen at his feet
  • striking water from the soil at Lagny with the point of his staff
  • watching a vision of angels
  • watching the flames of purgatory and hell
Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Fursey of Péronne“. CatholicSaints.Info. 28 August 2018. Web. 14 December 2018. <>