Posts tagged ‘Emblem Animals’

Saint Theonas of Egypt

image courtesy of the Digital Image Archive, Pitts Theology Library, Candler School of Theology, Emory UniversityMemorial

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Monk at Theibaid, Egypt and el-Bahnasa, Egypt.

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MLA Citation

  • “Saint Theonas of Egypt“. CatholicSaints.Info. 29 March 2019. Web. 4 December 2021. <>

Saint Baudolino

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Born to the nobility. Gave away all his wealth to the poor, and lived as a hermit in a hut on the banks of the River Tanaro. Miracle worker with the gifts of clairvoyance and prophesy; wild animals were reported to come to his hut to hear him speak about God. Tradition says that in 1174 he appeared on the walls of the city of Alessandria, putting a beseiging army to flight. Legends grew up around him, many of which turned him into a bishop or archbishop instead of the simple hermit he was.

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  • surrounded by peaceful wild animals
Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Baudolino“. CatholicSaints.Info. 15 June 2018. Web. 4 December 2021. <>

Saint Macarius the Younger

illustration of Saint Macarius the Younger; from 'Little Pictorial Lives of the Saints'Also known as

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Successful merchant in fruits, candies, and pastries in Alexandria, Egypt. Converting to Christianity, Macarius gave up his business in 335 to become a monk and hermit in the Thebaid, Upper Egypt. For a while he lived near and was a friend of Saint Anthony the Abbot. Macarius was a poet, healer, and friend to wild animals. He was exiled by heretic Arians with Saint Macarius the Elder and other monks to an island in the Nile because of his orthodoxy, but he was later allowed to return. In later life he travelled to Lower Egypt, and was ordained, and lived in a desert cell with other monks. He wrote a constitution for the monastery at Nitria named after him, and some of its rules were adopted by Saint Jerome for his monastery.

Amazing stories grew up his practice of severe austerities, some of which reached the proportion of legend.

For seven years he lived on raw vegetables dipped in water with a few crumbs of bread, moistened with drops of oil on feast days.

He once spent 20 days and 20 nights without sleep, burnt by the sun in the day, frozen by bitter desert cold cold at night. “My mind dried up because of lack of sleep, and I had a kind of delirium,” the hermit admitted. “So I gave in to nature and returned to my cell.”

Trying to get further from the world, and closer to God, Macarius moved to the desert of Nitria in Lower Egypt in 373. The journey was through a harsh land, at when Macarius was at the end of his strength, the devil appeared and asked, “Why not ask God for the food and strength to continue your journey?” Macarius answered, “The Lord is my strength and glory. Do not tempt a servant of God.” The devil then gave him a vision of a camel laden with food. Macarius was about to eat, but suspected a trap, and so prayed over the camel; it vanished.

He spent six months naked in the marshes, beset constantly by viscious blood-sucking flies and mosquitoes, in the hope of destroying his last bit of sexual desire. The terrible conditions and attacking insects left him so deformed that when he returned to the monks, they could recognize him only by his voice.

A young brother once offered Macarius some very fine grapes. The old fruit dealer was about to eat when he decided to sent them to a brother who was ill. This brother passed them to one he considered more in need; that one did the same, and on and on until the grapes made the rounds of all the cells and returned to Macarius.

Macarius returned to Skete and began to work on his worst vice – his love of travel. The devil appeared and suggested Macarius go to Rome and chase out the demons there. Torn between travelling for such a good cause, but wishing to fight his vice, Macarius filled a large basket with sand, put it on his back, and set out. When someone offered to help him, he said, “Leave me alone! I am punishing my tormenter. He wishes to lead me, old and weak as I am, on a distant and vain voyage.” He then returned to his cell, body broken with fatigue, but cured of his temptation.

In old age Macarius journeyed to a monastery where 1,400 hermits lived under the rigid rule of Saint Pachomius. Macarius was refused admittance. “You are too old to survive the great rigor we have here,” Pachomius told him. “One should be trained in it from childhood, or else one cannot stand it. Your health would fail and you would curse us for harming you.” Macarius then stood at the abbey gate for seven days and nights – without sleep, without food, without saying a word. Finally, the monks relented and he let him in. Macarius stood in a corner of the monastery in complete silence for all of Lent, living on a few cabbage leaves each Sunday “more to avoid ostentation, than from any real need.” The monks became so jealous of this new brother that they took their complaint to Pachomius, who asked God for illumination. When he learned that the old man was Macarius, he went to him and said, “My brother, I thank you for the lesson you have given my sons. It will prevent their boasting about their modest mortifications. You have edified us sufficiently. Return to your own monastery, and pray for us each day.”

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MLA Citation

  • “Saint Macarius the Younger“. CatholicSaints.Info. 15 September 2020. Web. 4 December 2021. <>

Saint Conrad of Piacenza

Saint Conrad of PiacenzaAlso known as

  • Conrad of Noto
  • Conrad Confalonieri
  • Corrado…
  • Currau…
  • Kerrew…

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Born to the nobility. Married to Euphrosyne, the daughter of a nobleman; the two led a pious life in the world. One day while hunting, Conrad ordered attendants to set fire to some brush in order to flush out the game. A strong wind carried the flames to nearby fields, forests, towns and villages, and Conrad fled in panic. An innocent peasant was imprisoned, tortured into a confession and condemned to death for the fire. Remorseful, Conrad stepped forward to confess, saving the man. He then paid for the damaged property, selling nearly all he owned in order to raise the cash.

Conrad and his wife saw the hand of God in the dramatic events, and chose to give the poor everything they had left. They then separated, she to a Poor Clare monastery, he to a group of Franciscan tertiary hermits. Conrad lived such a life of piety that his reputation for holiness spread quickly. He had the gift of healing. Visitors destroyed his solitude, so he fled to a the valley of Noto, Italy in Sicily where he lived 36 years in prayer as a hermit.

Legend says that when the Bishop of Syracuse visited him, the bishop asked if Conrad had anything to offers guests. Conrad said he would check in his cell. He returned carrying newly made cakes, which the bishop accepted as a miracle. Conrad returned the bishop‘s visit, and made a general confession to him. As he arrived, he was surrounded by fluttering birds, who escorted him back to Noto.

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MLA Citation

  • “Saint Conrad of Piacenza“. CatholicSaints.Info. 25 October 2021. Web. 4 December 2021. <>

Saint Martin de Porres

Saint Martin de PorresAlso known as

  • Martín de Porres Velázquez
  • Martin of Charity
  • Martin the Charitable
  • Saint of the Broom (for his devotion to his work, no matter how menial)

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The illegitimate son of a Spanish nobleman, Juan, and a young freed black slave, Anna Velasquez, Martin grew up in poverty. He spent part of his youth with a surgeonbarber from whom he learned some medicine and care of the sick. At age 11 he became a servant in the Holy Rosary Dominican priory in Lima, Peru. Promoted to almoner, he begged more than $2,000 a week from the rich to support the poor and sick of Lima. Placed in charge of the Dominican‘s infirmary; known for his tender care of the sick and for his spectacular cures. His superiors dropped the stipulation that “no black person may be received to the holy habit or profession of our Order” and Martin took vows as a Dominican brother in 1603. Established an orphanage and children‘s hospital for the poor children of the slums. Set up a shelter for the stray cats and dogs and nursed them back to health. Lived in self-imposed austerity, never ate meat, fasted continuously, and spent much time in prayer and meditation with a great devotion to the Holy Eucharist. Friend of Saint John de Massias.

He was venerated from the day of his death. Many miraculous cures, including raising the dead attributed to Brother Martin. First black saint from the Americas.

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One day an aged beggar, covered with ulcers and almost naked, stretched out his hand, and Saint Martin, seeing the Divine Mendicant in him, took him to his own bed, paying no heed to the fact that he was not perfectly neat and clean. One of his brethren, considering he had gone too far in his charity, reproved him. Saint Martin replied, ‘Compassion, my dear Brother, is preferable to cleanliness. Reflect that with a little soap I can easily clean my bed covers, but even with a torrent of tears I would never wash from my soul the stain that my harshness toward the unfortunate would create.’ – Father Arthur M. Granger, O.P.

It made him very unhappy to see foundlings and young orphans exposed to all sorts of hardships. In order to obviate this sad circumstance he had built a celebrated college at Lima, where they could be brought up in piety and taught to lead honest lives. His goodness was so great that he did not except animals from his kindness, and he often gave them his skillful help and care. It pleased God to honour by His celestial favours the noble charity of His servant.

Nearly all Spanish America calls him the Rats’ Saint because they say that his picture, if placed in the haunts of rats and mice, speedily causes these animals to disappear. In his convent in Peru the sacristan complained that the rats gnawed away his things, and proposed to destroy the disagreeable visitors with poison. Brother Martin dissuaded him from this cruelty. He then called all these little creatures and put a basket which he was holding upon the ground, and when they had all scrambled into the basket he carried them into the garden, promising to look to them every day, if they would cease from ravaging the provisions of the monastery. This is why he is represented with a basket in his hand surrounded by rats, either that he is about to feed them or to take them from the sacristy and gather them in the garden, in order to supply them with the leavings of the house. The Blessed Martin of Perres is invoked against rats. – from “The Little Bollandists” by Monsignor Paul Guérin, 1882

The example of Martin’s life is ample evidence that we can strive for holiness and salvation as Christ Jesus has shown us: first, by loving God “with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind; and second, by loving your neighbor as yourself.” When Martin had come to realize that Christ Jesus “suffered for us and that he carried our sins on his body to the cross, he would meditate with remarkable ardor and affection about Christ on the cross. He had an exceptional love for the great sacrament of the Eucharist and often spent long hours in prayer before the blessed sacrament. His desire was to receive the sacrament in Communion as often as he could. Saint Martin, always obedient and inspired by his divine teacher, dealt with his brothers and with that profound love which comes from pure faith and humility of spirit. He loved men and because he honestly looked on them as God’s children and as his own brothers and sisters. Such was his humility that he loved them even more than himself, and considered them to be better and more righteous than he was. He did not blame others for their shortcomings. Certain that he deserved more severe punishment for his sins than others did, he would overlook their worst offenses. He was tireless in his efforts to reform the criminal, and he would sit up with the sick to bring them comfort. For the poor he would provide food, clothing and medicine. He did all he could to care for poor farmhands, blacks, and mulattoes who were looked down upon as slaves, the dregs of society in their time. Common people responded by calling him, “Martin the charitable.” He excused the faults of others. He forgave the bitterest injuries, convinced that he deserved much severer punishments on account of his own sins. He tried with all his might to redeem the guilty; lovingly he comforted the sick; he provided food, clothing and medicine for the poor; he helped, as best he could, farm laborers and Negroes, as well as mulattoes, who were looked upon at that time as akin to slaves: thus he deserved to be called by the name the people gave him: ‘Martin of Charity.’ It is remarkable how even today his influence can still move us toward the things of heaven. Sad to say, not all of us understand these spiritual values as well as we should, not do we give them a proper place in our lives. Many of us, in fact, strongly attracted by sin, may look upon these values as of little moment, even something of a nuisance, or we ignore them altogether. It is deeply rewarding for men striving for salvation to follow in Christ’s footsteps and to obey God’s commandments. If only everyone could learn this lesson from the example that Martin gave us. – from a homily by Blessed Pope John XXIII given at the canonization of Saint Martin de Porres

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Martin de Porres“. CatholicSaints.Info. 7 November 2021. Web. 4 December 2021. <>