Posts tagged ‘Died in Argentina’

Blessed Wenceslao Pedernera

Memorial

Profile

Married layman in the diocese of La Rioja. Martyr.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Wenceslao Pedernera“. CatholicSaints.Info. 18 January 2019. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Blessed Carlos de Dios Murias

Blessed Carlos de Dios MuriasMemorial

Profile

Carlos studied civil engineering until he gave in to a call to religious life and the priesthood. Member of the Order of Friars Minor Conventual. Ordained a priest in the diocese of La Rioja, Argentina by Blessed Enrique Angelelli on 17 December 1972. Member of the Third World Movement of Priests. Worked with Blessed Gabriel Longueville to set up a Franciscan community to support the peasants in their economic struggles against large land owners. Kidnapped, imprisoned, tortured and murdered by members of the Federal Police for his work. Martyr.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Carlos de Dios Murias“. CatholicSaints.Info. 18 January 2019. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Blessed Gabriel-Joseph-Roger Longueville

Memorial

Profile

Priest of the diocese of Viviers, France. Fidei Donum missionary in the diocese of La Rioja, Argentina. Martyr.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Gabriel-Joseph-Roger Longueville“. CatholicSaints.Info. 18 January 2019. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Bishop Jorge Novak

Bishop Jorge NovakProfile

One of eight boys born to Jorge Novak and Christina Prediger. Young Jorge joined the Society of the Divine Word on 1 March 1947, making his solemn profession on 1 March 1953, and was ordained a priest on 10 January 1954 in Bahía Blanca, Argentina. He earned a doctorate in history from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, Italy in 1958. Provincial superior of the Society from 1972 to 1976, and in February 1976 he co-founded the Ecumenical Movement for Human Rights.

Chosen bishop of Quilmes, Argentina on 7 August 1976 by Pope Paul VI; he served for nearly 25 years, dying in office. Known for his defense of human rights, opposition to the violence of the civil war, and advocacy of the Church involvement against the Argentine dictatorship of the 1970s, for his support for proper economic policies and concern for jobs and charity to the poor. He preached against the 1982 Falklands War with the United Kingdom. In 1984 and 1985 he was struck down with Guillain-Barré Syndrome, which causes interference with motor skills, but was able to recover. Bishop Jorge became a spokesman for the families of the tens of thousands of people who been “disappeared” by the Argentine government. His Cause for Canonization has opened.

Born

Died

MLA Citation

  • “Bishop Jorge Novak“. CatholicSaints.Info. 4 November 2018. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Blessed Enrico Angelo Angelelli Carletti

Blessed Enrico Angelo Angelelli CarlettiMemorial

Profile

Son of Italian immigrants. He entered the seminary of Our Lady of Loreto at age 15, studied in Rome, Italy, and then was ordained a priest on 9 October 1949 at Rome for the diocese of Córdoba, Argentina. He served as a parish priest in Córdoba, founded youth groups, and ministering to the poor in their own neighborhoods.

Chosen Auxiliary Bishop of Córdoba and Titular Bishop of Lystra by Pope John XXIII on 12 December 1960. He became involved in renewal of the faith and parish life, and in labor union conflicts; this led to his arrest. Part in the first, third, and fourth sessions of the Second Vatican Council in 1962, 1964, and 1965. In 1965, to get him away from conflict with the civil authorities, he was relieved of part of his duties and exiled to serve as chaplain to a convent of Adoratrices at the Colegio Villa Eucharistica.

Chosen bishop of La Rioja, Argentina on 3 July 1968 by Pope Paul VI. There he encouraged the working classes to unionize, form co-operatives, farm idle lands, and generally join together to improve their lot, even against the prerogatives of the ruling class.

On 13 June 1973 Bishop Enrico was forced to abandon a church and flee when a mob broke in during services and began to stone him in retaliation for his work. He declared an interdict against the leaders and their supporters; he received the full support of his priests, but not his national conference of bishops, and the papal nuncio openly sided with those under interdict. Angelelli knew he was being targeted for assassination by the military for his opposition to the government, and he was right. On 4 August 1976 while driving a truck home with Father Arturo Pinto, coming from a Mass in El Chamical that had been celebrated for two murdered priests, Blessed Carlos de Dios Murias and Blessed Gabriel Longueville, Angelelli was intentionally wrecked by other vehicles, and then beaten to death in the road. His was one of many murders committed during the Argentinian Dirty War, was listed as a traffic accident, and it wasn’t until a decade later, on 19 June 1986, when a new, more democratic government was in power, that the death was officially declared a murder. The investigation and court battles continued for decades more before finally, on 5 July 2014, Commander Menéndez and Luis Estrella, who had headed the Air Force base and torture center at El Chamical, were sentenced to life for Angelelli’s murder.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

Readings

It’s my turn next. Blessed Enrico discussing the possibility of being murdered for his work

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Enrico Angelo Angelelli Carletti“. CatholicSaints.Info. 13 April 2019. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Saint Nazaria Ignacia March y Mesa

Saint Nazaria Ignacia March y MesaAlso known as

  • Nazaire de Sainte-Thérèse March Mesa
  • Nazaria Ignacia de Santa Teresa de Jesus

Memorial

Profile

Fourth of eighteen children born to José Alejandro March y Reus, a merchant, fisherman and industrial worker, and Nazaria Mesa Ramos; Nazaira had a twin sister, Ignazia, and ten brothers who survived infancy. She and her sister were baptized on the day they were born, Nazaria made her First Communion on 21 November 1898 and made a personal vow of consecration to God. Unlike many children who are drawn to religious life at an early age, her family was indifferent to the faith, and grew so tired of her of her devotions that they once “grounded” her from going to Mass. By the time she was confirmed on 15 March 1902, which was celebrated by Blessed Marcelo Spínola y Maestre, her family had grown used to her piety, and allowed her to join the Franciscan Third Order and more actively practice her faith. She succeeded in getting several of them to return to the Church.

In late 1904, business failures led the family to move to Mexico. On the trip, Nazarie met sisters in the Instituto de Hermanitas de los Ancianos Desamparados (Institute of Sisters of the Abandoned Elders), and was so inspired by their charism that on 7 December 1908 she followed a calling to religious life, and entered the Institute in Mexico City, Mexico; she made her perpetual vows on 1 January 1915, and took the name Sister Nazaire de Sainte-Thérèse. Her diaries of the time show a deep devotion to her calling, but struggles with her vows of obedience to her superiors.

She was assigned to the Institute hospice in Oruro, Bolivia where she worked as a cook, housekeeper, nurse and occasional beggar to support the poor and neglected for twelve years. The region around Oruro was not entirely Christian, many Protestant groups were establishing missions, and the few priests in the area were often lax or lived scandalous lives. Beginning in 1920 Sister Nazaire began to feel a call to found a new congregation devoted to missionary work, evanglization and religious education. On 18 January 1925, the feast of the Chair of Saint Peter, Sister Nazaire made a special vow of obedience to the Pope, and on Pentecost that year she made a vow to work for the union and extension of the Holy Catholic Church. On 16 June 1925, with six other sisters, she founded the Pontifical Crusade, later renamed the Congregation of the Missionary Crusaders of the Church, and began service as their superior. The mission of the Congregation was to catechize children and adults, support the work of priests, conduct missions, and to print and distribute short religious tracts.

Mother Nazaire met with opposition to her work, much of it from within Church administration. Her sisters in the Institute treated her as a traitor to her original vocation for turning away from their work; her superiors considered her disobedient, and some Claretian clergy considered her a glory-hound, ignoring all the help members of their order had given her. But Nazaire clung to Christ and pressed on.

Monsignor Felipe Cortesi, while in Bolivia, had worked to help Mother Nazaire to found the Congregation. When he was assigned to be the apostolic nuncio of Argentina in 1930, he asked had her open a Missionary Crusader house in Buenos Aires. The Congregation received an early test under fire during the 1932 to 1935 war between Bolivia and Paraguay; Mother Nazaire and the sisters cared for and brought the sacraments to soldiers on both sides, and helped establish homes for war orphans. In 1934 she founded the first magazine in Bolivia for women in religious life, Al Adalid de Cristo Rey, and the first female trade union, Sociedad de Obrera Católicas

In early 1934, Monsignor Cortesi asked the Vatican Congregation of Religious to approve the rules for the Crusaders that Nazaire had written, based on Ignatian spirituality. Later that year, Mother Nazaria travelled to Rome with an Argentinian pilgrimage group to work for the approval of her Rule. She made pilgrimages to several sites, and had a private audience with Pope Pius XI during which Nazaire said that she was willing to die for the Church; the Pope told her that she must, instead, live and work for the Church.

Leaving Italy for her native Spain, Mother Nazaire founded a retreat center for spiritual exercises in Madrid under the flag of Uruguay; the sisters there survived the Spanish Civil War as Franco did not wish to risk the international incident killing them would cause. With the help of the Bolivian government, Mother Nazaria was able to leave the persecutions in Spain and return to the Americas. She summoned a general chapter of the Congregation in 1937 to strengthen the unity and zeal of her sisters. Worked on the spiritual formation of new sisters, and set an example by her pious, simple life. To the superiors of the Congregation houses she always recommended a maternal approach to the sisters in their care, to remember their role as Mother of the house. When the Spanish Civil War ended, Nazaire returned to Spain to check on the sisters she had left behind, then returned to the Americas for the final time. The Congregation spread throughout South America and began to work in Portugal, Spain, France, Italy and Camaroon. Though Nazaire did not live to see it, the Congregation received Vatican recognition on 9 June 1947 by Pope Pius XII.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Canonized

Patronage

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Nazaria Ignacia March y Mesa“. CatholicSaints.Info. 1 February 2019. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Blessed María Antonia de Paz y Figueroa

Venerable María Antonia de Paz FigueroaAlso known as

  • María Antonia of Saint Joseph
  • Mama Antula

Memorial

Profile

Raised in a pious family, Maria early felt a call to religious life, but as there were no cloistered religious congregations in the region at the time, she simply donned a black robe and moved in with some other women who felt the same call. Under the spiritual direction of Jesuit Father Gaspar Juarez, she taught children, cared for the sick and poor, did needlework to help support herself, and assisted at retreats based on the Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius of Loyola. In 1767, King Charles III of Spain expelled the Jesuits; with her spiritual director gone, Maria herself started leading the retreats. She met some hostility as the Exercises are associated with Jesuits, but for years she used them as the basis for retreats in several cities, bringing the message of Christ to tens of thousands of people, and received the support of Archbishop Sebastián Malvar y Pinto of Buenos Aires. Founded the Daughters of the Divine Savior and a retreat house in Buenos Aires which continues its good work over two centuries later.

Born

Died

  • 67 March 1799 in the retreat house in Buenos Aires, Argentina of natural causes
  • interred in the Church of Our Lady of Mercy in Buenos Aires

Venerated

Beatified

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed María Antonia de Paz y Figueroa“. CatholicSaints.Info. 28 July 2019. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Blessed María del Tránsito de Jesús Sacramentado

Blessed María del Tránsito de Jesús SacramentadoAlso known as

  • María Cabanillas
  • María del Tránsito Cabanillas
  • María del Transito Eugenia de los Dolores Cabanillaswas
  • María del Tránsito Of Jesus In The Blessed Sacrament

Memorial

Profile

Third child born to Felipe Cabanillas and Francisca Antonia Luján Sánchez. Raised in a large, wealthy and pious family; she had ten siblings, three of whom died in childhood, one brother became a priest, three sisters nuns. Educated at home and then at Cordoba, Argentina where she studied and helped care for her seminarian younger brother until his ordination in 1853.

Maria’s father died in 1850, and the rest of the family moved to Cordoba, living near the church of San Roque. Maria stayed at home, helping her mother with the children, maintaining a personal piety and devotion to the Eucharist, working as a catechist, and visiting the poor and sick of Cordoba. Maria’s mother died on 13 April 1858.

With her family grown or gone, Maria now felt free to pursue her religious vocation, and she entered the Franciscan Third Order at age 37, devoting more of her day to prayer. In 1871 she met Mrs Isidora Ponce de León who was building a Carmelite monastery in Buenos Aires, Argentina. In 1872 Maria moved to Buenos Aries, and entered the monastery on 19 March 1873. For health reasons, she was forced to leave the cloister in April 1874. In September 1874 she entered the convent of the Sisters of the Visitation in Montevideo, Uruguay, but had to leave there in a few months due to her continuing health problems.

During this time of turmoil and rejection of her perceived vocation, Maria began again to ponder an idea that had followed her all her life – an education and assistance foundation to help children. Several Franciscans encouraged her, and Father Agustin Garzón offered her a house and his help and contacts. She obtained approval for the project on 8 December 1878, and with her companions Teresa Fronteras and Brigida Moyano, and Bother Cirlaco Porreca as director, she started the Congregation of the Franciscan Tertiary Missionaries of Argentina, dedicated to helping the poor, orphaned and abandoned. The three women made their religious profession on 2 February 1879, and their institute became offically affiliated with the Franciscans on 28 January 1880.

The new Congregation met with immediate success in vocations – the Argentinian colleges of Saint Margarite of Cortona in San Vicente, El Carmen in Rio Cuarto, and Immaculate Conception in Villa Nueva were founded during Maria’s lifetime. The work, however, ruined her already frail health, and she died within six years.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Additional Information

Readings

“Did not our hearts burn within us while he talked to us on the road, while he opened to us the Scriptures?” (Luke 24:32). This surprising confession of the disciples who first walked to Emmaus is what happened with the vocation of Mother María del Tránsito Cabanillas de Jesús Sacramentado, foundress of the Third Order Franciscan Missionaries and the first Argentinian woman to be beatified. The flame that burned in her heart brought María del Tránsito to seek intimacy with Christ in the contemplative life. She was not deterred when on account of bad health she had to abandon the monasteries where she was living, but continued with a confidence and abandonment to the divine will which she followed on her constant quest. The Franciscan ideal then appeared as the true way that God wanted for her and, aided by wise directors, she undertook a life of poverty, humility, patience and charity, giving rise to a new religious family. – from the beatification homily by Pope John Paul II

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed María del Tránsito de Jesús Sacramentado“. CatholicSaints.Info. 11 March 2019. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Venerable María Benita Arias

Venerable María Benita AriasProfile

For 30 years she used her own home to care for orphaned and abandoned children. Founded the Handmaids of Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament on 21 November 1876.

Born

Died

Venerated

MLA Citation

  • “Venerable María Benita Arias“. CatholicSaints.Info. 2 November 2016. Web. 13 November 2019. <>

Alphonsus Lambe

Alphonsus LambeAlso known as

  • Alfie Lambe
  • Brother Ignatius

Profile

Born to a pious farm family. A good student, he early showed interest in religious topics and the religious life. Joined the Irish Christian Brothers novitiate at age 16, taking the name Brother Ignatius, but within a year he was forced to leave due to ill health which included fainting spells. Upon returning home in 1949, he joined the Legion of Mary and soon became an enthusiastic member. Moved to Dublin, Ireland, and worked at the Morning Star hostel for homeless men. Worked to expand the Legion throughout Ireland. With Seamus Grace, he was sent as a Legion of Mary envoy to South America in 1953. Worked his remaining six years promoting the Legion of Mary in Colombia, Argentina, Ecuador, Uruguay and Brazil; reported to have established over 2,000 groups. Had a great facility for languages and quickly learned Spanish and Portuguese. His enthusiasm for the faith and the Legion was contagious, and he taught and inspired many.

Born

Died

Additional Information

Readings

Alfie’s life was like a meteor. It flashed suddenly before us, soaring to great heights in the sky, but hardly had we time to admire it, than it was gone. – Hilde Firtel, Legion of Mary envoy

O God, who by your infinite mercy inflamed the heart of your servant, Alphonsus Lambe with an ardent love for you and for Mary, our Mother; a love which revealed itself in a life of intense labour, prayer and sacrifice for the salvation of souls, grant, if it be your will, that we may obtain, by his intercession, what we cannot obtain by our own merits. We ask this through Jesus Christ, Our Lord, Amen. – Prayer for the Beatification of the Servant of God, Alphonsus Lambe

MLA Citation

  • “Alphonsus Lambe“. CatholicSaints.Info. 12 June 2017. Web. 13 November 2019. <>