Giovanni d’Andrea

Profile

Canonist. He was educated at the University of Bologna, taught at Padua and Pisa, and became professor of canon law at Bologna. Works: “Glossary of the Six Books of decretals”; “Glossary of the Clementine books; Treatise, or Commentary on the decretal letters of Gregory IX”; “Mercuriales, or commentary on the six rules; Book of the praises of Saint Jerome; Addenda to the Speculum of Durandus.”

Born

Died

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Giovanni d’Andrea”. New Catholic Dictionary. CatholicSaints.Info. 19 November 2019. Web. 20 November 2019. <>

Father António de Andrade

Father António de AndradeProfile

Missionary; he was the first European to cross the Himalayas and reach Tibet. For four years he was the chief Jesuit missionary in the Indies. He succeeded in penetrating into Tibet, and establishing a mission at Chaparangue. Recalled to Goa, he became superior of the Indies and died for the Faith.

Born

Died

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Father António de Andrade”. New Catholic Dictionary. CatholicSaints.Info. 19 November 2019. Web. 20 November 2019. <>

Father Patrick Anderson

Profile

Missionary and writer. He entered the Society of Jesus, 1597, and in 1609 was appointed to the Scottish mission, where his labors were successful and his escapes marvelous. In 1615 he became rector of Scots College. On his return to Scotland, he was betrayed and imprisoned, and later liberated, probably through the offices of the French ambassador. He wrote, among other things, “Memoirs of the Scottish Saints.”

Born

Died

MLA Citation

  • “Father Patrick Anderson”. New Catholic Dictionary. CatholicSaints.Info. 19 November 2019. Web. 20 November 2019. <>

Henry James Anderson

Profile

Scientist and educator. He was professor of mathematics and astronomy, Columbia College, New York, and accompanied the United States Dead Sea Exploration, 1848. Becoming a Catholic, he was first president of the Supreme Council of the Society of Saint Vincent de Paul in New York, founder of the New York Catholic Protectory, Knight Commander of the Order of Saint Gregory the Great, and president of the Catholic Union which he organized for the defense of papal rights and promotion of the Catholic religion. He died on his return journey from Australia where he had gone to observe the transit of Venus. In addition to several articles contributed to scientific papers, he was the author of “Geological Reconnaissance of Part of the Holy Land,” published by the United States government.

Born

Died

MLA Citation

  • “Henry James Anderson”. New Catholic Dictionary. CatholicSaints.Info. 19 November 2019. Web. 20 November 2019. <>

A Year with the Saints – 29 February

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Humility, to be true, must be always accompanied by charity; that is, loving, seeking, and accepting humiliations to please God, and to become more like Jesus Christ; to do otherwise, would be to practice it in the manner of the heathen. Saint Francis de Sales

It cannot be said that Saint Vincent de Paul was wanting in true humility. However much he did to conceal, abase, humiliate, and render himself despicable in the eyes of the world, allowing no opportunity for humbling himself to pass without accepting it with all willingness and joy, he yet did it all because it expressed the sentiments of his own heart in regard to himself and his nothingness, as well as to act out and imitate the humiliations of the Son of God, Who, as he said one day in a conference, being the brightness of His Father’s glory and the image of His substance, not content with having led a life which might be called a continual humiliation, willed even after His death to remain before our eyes in a state of extreme ignominy, when He hung upon the Cross. Thus the humility of this servant of God was from his heart, and so sincere that it could be read on his brow, in his eyes, and in his whole exterior.

Saint Jerome relates of Saint Paula that when she heard it said that she had become a fool through too much spiritual fervor and that it would be well if a hole were made in her head to give air to her brain, she answered modestly, in the words of the Apostle, “We are fools for Christ’s sake”. She added also that the same thing had happened to Jesus Christ, when His relations wished to confine Him as a madman. Saint Jerome also says that when she received insults, contempt, or ignominy, she never allowed the slightest word of resentment to escape from her lips, but was accustomed in such cases to repeat to herself the words of the psalm: Ego autem quasi surdus non audiebam, et quasi mutus, non aperiens os suum – But I as a deaf man, heard not, and as a dumb man, who opens not his mouth.

MLA Citation

A Year with the Saints – 28 February

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All those who have truly wished to arrive at the possession of humility have applied themselves with all their power to the practice of humiliation, because they know that this is the quickest and shortest road thereto. Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

The blessed Alessandro Sauli, Bishop of Aleria, a man of learning and esteemed in his Order, willingly occupied himself, even when he was Superior, in humble employments such as sweeping the house, washing the dishes, drawing water, bringing wood to the kitchen, working in the garden, serving the old and the sick, carrying heavy burdens on his back, taking charge of the door, ringing the bells, or helping the sacristan. When, on account of preaching or other spiritual works, he was at any time prevented from performing these daily exercises, he was accustomed to supply the omission by doing double work on the next day.

Saint Camillus de Lellis was also remarkable in this way. When he was Superior General of his Order, he was often seen serving in the refectory, washing dishes in the kitchen, carrying the cross, and sometimes even the coffin, at funerals, and going about Rome with a wallet on his shoulders, begging bread – though he was blamed for it by some great nobles and cardinals who were his friends and happened to meet him in the streets in this guise. The venerable Mother Seraphina often employed herself in humble tasks; she was also seen many times rubbing her face with an old shoe.

Saint Mary Magdalen de’ Pazzi, of her own accord, adopted practices that might bring her into contempt, such as having her eyes bandaged, her hands tied behind her back, being trampled upon, struck, or rudely addressed.

We read of Saint Policronius that he wore a wretched habit, ate poor and very scanty food, and passed almost all night in prayer with an oak log on his shoulders, so heavy that Theodoret, the author of his life, who had seen the log, found by experiment that he could scarcely lift it from the ground with both hands.

Saint Rose of Lima, besides occupying herself as a servant in the lowest offices every day, invented a strange method of lowering herself still more. Having in the house a woman-servant of harsh temper and exceedingly coarse nature, she induced her, by urgent entreaties, to maltreat her both in words and acts. Retiring with her into a lonely part of the house, and throwing herself upon the floor, the Saint would cause this person to spit in her face, trample her underfoot, strike her with her fist, kick and beat her, as teamsters sometimes do a horse; nor would she rise to her feet until she had obtained as much of this treatment as she desired.

Saint John Climacus tells of a monk who had a great love for humility, that he devised this plan to overcome the thoughts of pride with which the devil inspired him. He wrote upon the wall of his cell these memorable words: Perfect charity. Loftiest contemplation. Total mortification. Unalterable sweetness. Unconquerable patience. Angelic chastity. Profoundest humility. Filial confidence. Promptest diligence. Utter resignation. So, when the devil began to urge him to pride, he answered within himself, “Let us try the test.” Then approaching the wall, he read these headings: “Perfect charity. Charity, yes, but how perfect, if I speak evil of others? Profoundest humility. This I have not; it is quite enough if I claim the profound. Angelic chastity. How can this be mine, when I allow admittance to unchaste thoughts? Loftiest contemplation. No, I have many distractions. Total mortification. No, for I seek my own gratification. Unalterable sweetness. No, for at the least vexation I lose my self-control.” And so with all the rest. In this way he banished the temptation to vanity.

MLA Citation

A Year with the Saints – 27 February

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Here is one of the best means to acquire humility: fix well in mind this maxim: One is as much as he is in the sight of God, and no more. – Thomas a Kempis

Saint Francis made a beginning of sanctity by trampling underfoot human respect; for he had thoroughly penetrated the truth of this holy maxim which he often revolved in his mind.

In this solid maxim, Saint Francis de Sales was equally well-founded and established. Therefore, he had his own reputation very little at heart, and did not care at all how others might feel in regard to him. In conversation, he once said: “Oh that it were God’s pleasure that my innocence should never be recognized even in the day of universal judgment, but that it should remain always hidden and eternally concealed in the secret recesses of the eternal wisdom!” And again: “If the grace of God had caused me to perform any work of righteousness, or had wrought any good by my means, I should be content that in the day of judgment, when the secrets of hearts are manifested, God alone should know of my righteousness; and my unrighteousness, on the contrary, should be seen by every creature.”

MLA Citation

A Year with the Saints – 26 February

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Sometimes a soul rises more towards perfection by not excusing herself than by ten sermons. Since by this means one begins to acquire freedom, and indifference as to what good or evil may be said. Nay more; by a habit of not replying, one arrives at such a point that when he hears anything said of himself, it does not seem as if it related to him, but rather like an affair belonging to someone else. Saint Teresa of Avila

Father Alvarez, the confessor of Saint Teresa, having been falsely accused of a grave fault in a provincial assembly and seriously reproved for it in public, said nothing, either in public or private, in his own defense. Afterwards, God rewarded this heroic silence with extraordinary favors.

Among the ancient monks, there was one named Eulogius, very humble and patient. Wherefore, the lax and negligent threw all their faults upon him; and he, being corrected and reproved for them, humbly accepted, without any denial or excuse, the penances which were given for them and performed them with great patience. The older Fathers, seeing him every day under reprehension, were displeased with him, and told the Abbot that he ought to apply some remedy, for they could not bear this state of things any longer. The Abbot took time, and, in prayer, entreated the Lord to enlighten him, and teach him what he ought to do with this brother. Then God revealed to him his innocence and great sanctity. Being extremely astonished at this, he called together all the monks, and said to them: “Believe me, I would prefer the faults of Eulogius with his patience and humility, to all the good works and virtues of many others who murmur against him, and think they are doing well themselves. And that you may see how great is the virtue of our companion, let each of you bring here the mat on which he sleeps.” When all the mats were brought, he had a good fire lit and threw them all into it. Everyone was instantly burned except that of Brother Eulogius, which remained. Then, prostrate upon the ground, they all asked pardon of God, and conceived the highest opinion of their brother. But he was grieved at being discovered, and the next night fled to the desert, where he would be unknown; for he knew very well that no one can be honored in this world and in the next.

MLA Citation

A Year with the Saints – 25 February

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One who wishes to become truly holy ought not, except in a few unusual cases, to excuse himself, although that for which he is blamed be not true. Jesus Christ acted thus. He heard Himself charged with evil which He had not done, but said not a word to free Himself from the disgrace. Saint Philip Neri

The Empress Leonora was treated by her mother always with harshness, and without any appearance of affection. For the smallest things that were observed by no one else, her mother reproved her sharply at every turn, and frequently struck her. The good child remained always in silence, with her eyes cast down, uttering not a word in her defense, still less complaining or weeping. Often when the tempest has passed, she would kneel and kiss her mother’s feet, asking her pardon and promising amendment.

Saint Vincent de Paul never justified himself against the complaints and calumnies brought against him and his Congregation, whatever trouble or loss they might cause. Once when he had used his influence to prevent a bishopric from being conferred on one of his subjects, whom he considered unworthy of it, the disappointed candidate invented an enormous calumny against him, which came to the ears of the Queen. One day, meeting the Saint, she told him laughingly that he had been accused of such and such a thing. He calmly replied, “Madam, I am a great sinner.” When her Majesty said that he ought to assert his innocence, he answered, “Quite as much was said against Christ our Lord, and He never justified Himself.” It happened that, one time, in a public hall, a nobleman said that the missionary zeal of Saint Vincent’s followers had greatly cooled. When the Saint heard this, he would not say a word in defense, though he could easily have proved the contrary of the assertion, for in that year and the preceding more missions had been given than ever before. To one who urged him to take notice of the affair by telling him that this gentleman, though not knowing the truth, was continuing to speak evil of the Congregation, he answered, “We will let him talk. For my part, I will never justify myself except by my works.” It chanced, one day, that a prelate, having summoned the Saint to an assembly where many persons of rank were present, reproved him publicly for a thing for which he was not at all to blame. But he, without a word of complaint or excuse, immediately knelt and asked pardon, to the great admiration of those present, to whom his innocence was known. One of them, a man of much piety and learning, after the assembly was over and the Saint was gone, said that he was a man of extraordinary virtue and of a supernatural and Divine spirit.

The venerable Mother Seraphina never excused herself, even to her confessors, though they might blame her wrongfully; nor did she explain how matters really stood, unless obliged by obedience. Once, in particular, when she was sharply reproved by her director, though the thing laid to her charge was not true, she replied only: “You are right.” Afterwards, he commanded her to tell him the truth, and on hearing it he was sorry for his wrongful accusations.

MLA Citation

A Year with the Saints – 24 February

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In my opinion, we shall never acquire true humility unless we raise our eyes to behold God. Looking upon His greatness, the soul sees better her own littleness; beholding His purity, she is the more aware of her own uncleanness; considering His patience, she feels how far she is from being patient; in fine, turning her glance upon the Divine perfections, she discovers in herself so many imperfections that she would gladly close her eyes to them. Saint Teresa of Avila

This was, in truth, one of the principal fountains from which Saint Vincent de Paul drew that humble opinion which he had of himself, as well as his great desire for humiliations. That is to say, he derived them from the profound knowledge which he had of the infinite perfections of God, and of the extreme weakness and misery of creatures; so that he thought it a manifest injustice not to humiliate himself always and in all things. In a conference one day with his priests, he spoke thus: “In truth, if each of us will give his attention to knowing himself well before God, he will find it to be the most just and reasonable thing to despise and humble himself. For, if we seriously consider the natural and continual inclination we have to evil, our natural incapacity for good, and the experience we all have had that even when we think we have succeeded well in something and that our plans are wise, the matter often turns out quite different from our anticipations, and God permits us to be considered wanting in judgment; and that, finally, in all we think, say, or do, both in substance and circumstances, we are always filled and encompassed with motives for humiliation and confusion – how shall we not consider ourselves worthy to be repulsed and despised in reflecting upon such things, and in seeing ourselves so far from the holiness and sublime perfections of God, and from the marvellous operations of His grace, and from the life of Christ our Lord?”

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