Posts tagged ‘Saints who were Hermits’

Blessed Bernard of Sithiu

Blessed Bernard of SithiuAlso known as

  • Bernard of Maguellone
  • Bernard the Penitent

Memorial

Profile

To atone for the sins of his early life, including a murder, Bernard lived in complete poverty, wearing rags, eating whatever came to hand, if anything, travelling barefoot from one holy place to another, and living as a hermit between pilgrimages. In 1178 he settled near the abbey of Sithiu and spent his remaining four years in private penance and prayer.

Died

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Bernard of Sithiu“. CatholicSaints.Info. 18 April 2017. Web. 19 August 2017. <>

Blessed Lanunio

detail of a bas-relief medallion of Blessed Lanunio, date and artist unknown; swiped from Santi e BeatiMemorial

Profile

Hermit at Santa Maria della Torre, diocese of Squillace, Calabria, Italy. When Saint Bruno began what became the Carthusians at the Grand Cartreuse in France, Lanunio travelled there to join them. There he became the friend and travelling companion of Saint Bruno, and took over took over leadership of the Order when Bruno died in 1101. Founded several monasteries, and organized the leadership and religious life of their monks. Supported and held in high regard by Pope Paschal II for whom he performed a number of tasks and missions in the region of Calabria. Apostolic Visitor to all monasteries in Calabria.

Born

Died

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Lanunio“. CatholicSaints.Info. 10 April 2017. Web. 19 August 2017. <>

Blessed Damiano

Memorial

Profile

Nephew and spiritual student of Saint Pier Damiano. Camaldolese hermit in Fonte Avellana, Italy. Studied in Paris, France. Prior of his hermitage. Cardinal of the Church.

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Damiano“. CatholicSaints.Info. 30 March 2017. Web. 19 August 2017. <>

Saint Nicodemus of Mammola

Saint Nicodemus of MammolaAlso known as

  • Nicodemus of Cirò
  • Nicodemus of Cellerano
  • Nicodemus of Kellerano
  • Nicodemo of…

Memorial

Profile

Son of Theophanes and Pandia. Educated by a local priest, Father Galatone, known for his learning and piety. Even as a young man, Nicodemus was disgusted by the mis-spent lives of his contemporaries, and was drawn to the monastic life. He tried to join the monks in the San Mercurius abbey on Mount Pollino in the Calabria region of Italy; it was a hard, ascetic life for these monks, dressed in goat skins, going bare-foot in all seasons, surviving on chestnuts and lupins with a cave for shelter and some straw for a bed, and Nicodemus was initially turned away by the abbot, Saint Fantinus, who thought the young man’s health too frail for a monk‘s life. But Nicodemus persevered, and Fantinus eventually relented and welcomed him to the community. Brother monk with Saint Nilus of Rossano.

Feeling the need for greater solitude, Nicodemus withdrew to live as a hermit on Monte Cellerano in Locri, Italy. His reputation for wisdom and piety followed him, though, and he soon attracted several spiritual students, and organized them in to a colony that lived separately but met once a week. However, his community became too well known; there were too many would be students, too many lay visitors, and too many incursions by Saracen invaders. The monks dispersed to various monasteries. Nicodemus moved first to a house in Gerace, Italy, and then to a monastery near Mammola, Italy where he spent the rest of his life. His reputation for holiness was such that, upon his death, the monastery was renamed San Nicodemo in his honour.

Born

Died

Canonized

Patronage

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Nicodemus of Mammola“. CatholicSaints.Info. 27 March 2017. Web. 19 August 2017. <>

Blessed Tommaso of Costacciaro

detail of an antique Italian Blessed Tommaso of Costacciaro holy card, date and artist unknown; swiped from Santi e BeatiMemorial

Profile

After a visit to a Camaldolese hermitage in 1270, Tommaso was drawn to the monastic and eremetical life. Camaldolese monk in the abbey of Santa Maria in Sitria, Italy. Hermit on Monte Cucco in the Umbria region of Italy for over 60 years, living a life of utter poverty and denial in order to spend all his time in prayer and meditation.

Born

Died

Beatified

Patronage

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Tommaso of Costacciaro“. CatholicSaints.Info. 25 March 2017. Web. 19 August 2017. <>

Blessed Giustina Bezzoli Francucci

detail of an antique Italian holy card of Blessed Giustina Bezzoli Francucci, date, artist and publisher unknown; swiped from Santi e BeatiMemorial

Profile

Born to the nobility, Giustina grew up in a wealthy household. As a child, she frequently fasted on her own, and had a habit of hiding away to pray. She was drawn to the religious life, but her parents strongly opposed it, not wishing to lose their only daughter to the cloister. However, her father fell seriously ill, and during his recovery time he meditated on what was and was not important in life. This led him to give his blessing to Giustina becoming a nun. She began her Benedictine novitiate at the monastery of San Marco at age 12; legend says that a dove landed on her as she walk into the convent, and all took this as a sign of blessing from the Holy Spirit on her choice. Feeling the need for more solitude, with her bishop‘s permission she became a hermitess and anchoress. She lived in isolation for 35 years; legend says that when wolves would gather around her hermitage, an angel would drive them off. In later years, her health began to fail, she became blindess, and she was forced to return to live in the convent. When the convent became unsafe due to civil unrest, she returned to her family home in 1315, and spent her remaining years there. Subject to ecstasies and received visions.

Born

Died

Beatified

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Giustina Bezzoli Francucci“. CatholicSaints.Info. 11 March 2017. Web. 19 August 2017. <>

Saint Thalilaeus

Also known as

  • Epiklautos ( = weeping much, as he was known to cry when moved)
  • Thalelaeus

Memorial

Profile

Fifth-century hermit for 60 years, sometimes living with no shelter but a barrel, near a pagan temple outside Gabala (Gala) in modern Syria. He made it a point to speak to the people going to the temple, and converted many of them to Christianity.

Born

  • Cilicia (modern Turkey)

Canonized

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Thalilaeus“. CatholicSaints.Info. 19 February 2017. Web. 19 August 2017. <>

Saint Limnaeus

Memorial

Profile

Fifth-century cave hermit near Cyrrhus (in modern Syria). Spiritual student of Saint Thalassius. Spiritual student of Saint Maro. Lived in a small stone hut on a hill top, and talked to would-be students through a small hole; they came so frequently that he built a house on the hill top for them to stay. A noted healer, he built two houses for the blind, and induced any would-be spiritual students to contribute to care for the poor and lame.

Canonized

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Limnaeus“. CatholicSaints.Info. 19 February 2017. Web. 19 August 2017. <>

Saint Thalassius

Memorial

Profile

Fifth-century cave hermit near Cyrrhus (in modern Syria). Spiritual teacher of Saint limnaeus. Known for his personal piety and holiness.

Canonized

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Thalassius“. CatholicSaints.Info. 19 February 2017. Web. 19 August 2017. <>

Saint Castor of Karden

statue of Saint Castor at the heritage fountain of Saint Castor, Treis-Karden, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany; date and artist unknown; photographed on 6 August 2012 by kaʁstn; swiped from Wikimedia CommonsAlso known as

  • Kastor von Karden

Memorial

Profile

Spiritual student of Saint Maximinus of Trier. Priest, ordained by Maximinus in the mid-4th-century. Hermit at Karden in the Moselle river region where he ministered to other hermits and small religious groups, including Saint Potentinus his sons Felicius and Simplicius.

Born

Died

Patronage

Canonized

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Castor of Karden“. CatholicSaints.Info. 12 February 2017. Web. 19 August 2017. <>