My Bible History, OT 17 – Jacob and Rachel

Jacob answered, 'I will serve you seven years without wages, if you will let me marry your daughter Rachel'Jacob answered, ‘I will serve you seven years without wages, if you will let me marry your daughter Rachel’On the way to Haran, Jacob came to a well near which flocks of sheep were lying. There was a large stone over the well. When all the flocks were there, the shepherds used to roll away the stone, let the sheep drink. and then put back the stone over the well.

Jacob went up to the shepherds of the flocks, and asked them if they knew Laban. Some of the shepherds replied. “Yes, we know him.”

As they spoke, a young girl was seen coming. driving her sheep towards the well. The shepherds said to Jacob, “Here comes Rachel, Laban’s daughter, with her father’s flocks.”

When Jacob saw Rachel, be rolled away the stone that covered the well’s mouth, so that her sheep might drink. “I am Jacob, son of Rebecca, your father’s sister,” he said to her.

Rachel received Jacob gladly. She ran to tell her father the news.

Upon hearing of the arrival of Jacob, Laban hastened to make him welcome.

Jacob told Laban why he had come to Haran. He asked to be allowed to stay and work for him.

After a month, Laban asked. “What wages do you want for your labor?”

Jacob answered, “I will serve you seven years without wages, if you will let me marry your daughter Rachel.”

Laban agreed, saying, “It is better that I should give her to you than to a stranger. Let it be as you wish.”

From that time Jacob served Laban faithfully. He loved Rachel, and was glad to work for her.

At last Laban gave him Rachel for his wife. In this way Jacob found Rachel his wife in the land of his mother’s people.

Even after his marriage, Jacob stayed with Laban and worked for him. God blessed Jacob and gave him many riches. In time he owned large flocks. He became so rich that at last Laban became envious, and even tried to cheat Jacob.

– from My Bible History in Pictures, by Bishop Louis LaRavoire Morrow, D.D., 1934; it has the Imprimatur of Archbishop Michael J O’Doherty of Manila, Philippines