Catholic Encyclopedia – Blessed Hugh Faringdon

Article

(Vere Cook) English martyr; born probably at Faringdon, Berkshire, date unknown; died at Reading, 15 November 1539. The name of his probable birthplace is also the surname by which he is generally known, but he bore the arms of Cook of Kent. He was elected Abbot of Reading in July, and confirmed, 26 September 1520. Henry VIII was his guest on 30 January 1521, and he later became one of the royal chaplains. Among Henry’s New Year gifts in 1532 was £20 in a white leather purse to the Abbot of Reading. Faringdon sat in Parliament from 1523 to 1539. In 1536 he signed the articles of faith passed by Convocation at the king’s desire, which virtually acknowledge the royal supremacy. On Sunday, 4 November 1537, he sang the requiem and dirge for Queen Jane Seymour, and was present at the burial on 12 November. As late as March, 1538, he was in favour, being placed in the commission of the peace for Berkshire; but in 1539, as he declined to surrender the abbey, it became necessary to attaint him of high treason. As a mitred abbot he was entitled to be tried by Parliament, but no scruples troubled the chancellor, Thomas Cromwell. His death sentence was passed before his trial began. With him suffered John Eynon (or Onyon), a priest of Saint Giles’s, Reading, and John Rugg, a former fellow of the two Saint Mary Winton colleges and the first holder of the Wykehamical prebend “Bursalis” at Chichester, who had obtained a dispensation from residence and was living at Reading in 1532.

MLA Citation

  • John Wainewright. “Blessed Hugh Faringdon”. Catholic Encyclopedia, 1913. CatholicSaints.Info. 14 November 2013. Web. 23 September 2018. <>