Archive for the ‘Library of the Faith’ Category.

Book of Saints – Winnow, Mancus and Myrbad

main article for Saint Winnow of CornwallArticle

(May 31) (Saints) (6th century, probably.) Three Irish Saints who lived in the sixth century in Cornwall, and who have churches dedicated in their honour.

MLA Citation

  • Monks of Ramsgate. “Winnow, Mancus and Myrbad”. Book of Saints, 1921. CatholicSaints.Info. 11 September 2017. Web. 24 September 2017. <>

Book of Saints – William Fylby

main article for Blessed William FilbyArticle

(Blessed) Martyr (May 30) (16th century) William Fylby (Filbie), a native of Oxford and member of the University, leaving England, was ordained priest at Rheims. He was arrested shortly after his return to his own country, and put to death as a Catholic priest, A.D. 1582.

MLA Citation

  • Monks of Ramsgate. “William Fylby”. Book of Saints, 1921. CatholicSaints.Info. 11 September 2017. Web. 24 September 2017. <>

Book of Saints – Walstan

image of Saint Walstan from a rood screen in Saint Andrew's church; uploaded on 25 April 2011 by Amitchell125; swiped off the Wikipedia web siteArticle

(Saint) (May 30) (11th century) A humble farm-labourer in Norfolk who, by his charity to all in need and by his wonderfully austere and prayerful life, came to be canonised by his contemporaries, eye-witnesses of his sanctity. He passed away A.D. 1016.

MLA Citation

  • Monks of Ramsgate. “Walstan”. Book of Saints, 1921. CatholicSaints.Info. 11 September 2017. Web. 24 September 2017. <>

Book of Saints – Thomas Cottam

stained glass window of Blessed Thomas Cottam, church of Our Lady and the English Martyrs in Cambridge, England; swiped with permission from the flick.com account of Father Lawrence Lew, OPArticle

(Blessed) Martyr (May 30) (16th century) A native of Lancashire who entered the Society of Jesus in Rome and, returning to England, was put to death at Tyburn for the Faith (A.D. 1582). His last words were expressions of charity and forgiveness to all.

MLA Citation

  • Monks of Ramsgate. “Thomas Cottam”. Book of Saints, 1921. CatholicSaints.Info. 11 September 2017. Web. 24 September 2017. <>

Book of Saints – Sycus and Palatinus

Article

(Saints) Martyrs (May 30) (Date unknown) The most ancient Martyrologies do no more than register the names of these Saints with the note that for Christ’s sake they suffered many tortures at Antioch in Syria. Their names are variously spelled. There is no further record of them.

MLA Citation

  • Monks of Ramsgate. “Sycus and Palatinus”. Book of Saints, 1921. CatholicSaints.Info. 11 September 2017. Web. 24 September 2017. <>

Book of Saints – Theodosia and Others

main article for Saint Theodosia of CaesareaArticle

(Saints) Martyrs (May 29) (4th century) Saint Theodosia, mother of the Martyr Saint Procopius is, by tradition, held to have suffered death for the Christian Faith, together with twelve other pious women, at Caesarea Philippi in Palestine, about A.D. 303. But the learned Bollandists put little faith in the legends current concerning them.

MLA Citation

  • Monks of Ramsgate. “Theodosia and Others”. Book of Saints, 1921. CatholicSaints.Info. 11 September 2017. Web. 24 September 2017. <>

Book of Saints – Sisinius, Martyrius and Alexander

Martyrs of TrentinoArticle

(Saints) Martyrs (May 29) (4th century) Eastern Christians from Cappadocia (Asia Minor), received by Saint Ambrose and sent as missionaries into the Alpine districts. There they met with their death at the hands of the Pagans (A.D. 397). There is extant a letter to Saint Simplician, successor of Saint Ambrose at Milan, from Saint Vigilius, Bishop of Trent at the time. It gives a pathetic account of the sufferings of these Martyrs.

MLA Citation

  • Monks of Ramsgate. “Sisinius, Martyrius and Alexander”. Book of Saints, 1921. CatholicSaints.Info. 11 September 2017. Web. 24 September 2017. <>

The Proper Office of the Saints – Saint Bernard, Abbat of Clairvaux, Confessor and Doctor of the Church, 20 August

painting of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, the church of Heiligenkreuz Abbey near Baden bei Wien, Lower Austria, by Georg Andreas WasshuberBernard was born in the year of salvation 1091 at a decent place in Burgundy called Fontaines. On account of extraordinary good looks, he was as a boy very much sought after by women, but he could never be turned aside from his resolution to keep chaste. To fly from these temptations of the devil, he determined at two-and-twenty years of age to enter the Monastery of Citeaux, whence the Cistercian Order took its rise. When this resolution of Bernard’s became known, his brothers did all their diligence to change his purpose, but he only became the more eloquent and happy about it. Them and others he so brought over to his mind, that thirty young men entered the same Order along with him. As a monk he was so given to fasting, that as often as he had to eat, so often he seemed to be in pain. He exercised himself wonderfully in watching and prayer, and was a great lover of Christian poverty. Thus he led on earth an heavenly life, purged of all care and desire for transitory things.

He was a burning and shining light of lowliness, mercifulness, and kindness. His concentration of thought was such, that he hardly used his senses except to do good works, in which latter he acted with admirable wisdom. Thus occupied, he refused the Bishoprics of Genoa, Milan, and others, which were offered to him, declaring that he was unworthy of so high a sphere of duty. Being made Abbat of Clairvaux in 1115, he built monasteries in many places, wherein the excellent rules and discipline of Bernard long flourished. When Pope Innocent II, in 1138, restored the monastery of Saint Vincent and Saint Anastasius at Rome, Bernard set over it the Abbat who was afterwards the Supreme Pontiff” Eugene III, and who is also the same to whom he addressed his book upon “Consideration.”

He was the author of many writings, in which it is manifest that his teaching was rather given him of God, than gained by hard work. In consequence of his high reputation for excellence, he was called by the most exalted Princes to act as arbiter of their disputes, and for this end, and to settle affairs of the Church, he often went to Italy. He was an eminent helper to Pope Innocent II, in putting down the schism of Peter Leoni, and worked to this end, both at the Courts of the Emperor and of Henry King of England, and in the Council of Pisa. He fell asleep in the Lord, at Clairvaux, on the 20th day of August, in the year 1153, the sixty-third year of his age. He was famous for miracles, and Pope Alexander III numbered him among the Saints. Pope Pius VIII, acting on the advice of the Congregation of Sacred Rites, declared and confirmed Saint Bernard a Doctor of the Universal Church. He also commanded that all should use the Mass and Office for him as for a Doctor, and granted perpetual yearly plenary indulgences to all who should visit Churches of the Cistercian Order upon the Feastday of this Saint.

– from The Roman Breviary, translated by John Patrick Crichton-Stuart, 1908

My Bible History, OT 17 – Jacob and Rachel

Jacob answered, 'I will serve you seven years without wages, if you will let me marry your daughter Rachel'Jacob answered, ‘I will serve you seven years without wages, if you will let me marry your daughter Rachel’On the way to Haran, Jacob came to a well near which flocks of sheep were lying. There was a large stone over the well. When all the flocks were there, the shepherds used to roll away the stone, let the sheep drink. and then put back the stone over the well.

Jacob went up to the shepherds of the flocks, and asked them if they knew Laban. Some of the shepherds replied. “Yes, we know him.”

As they spoke, a young girl was seen coming. driving her sheep towards the well. The shepherds said to Jacob, “Here comes Rachel, Laban’s daughter, with her father’s flocks.”

When Jacob saw Rachel, be rolled away the stone that covered the well’s mouth, so that her sheep might drink. “I am Jacob, son of Rebecca, your father’s sister,” he said to her.

Rachel received Jacob gladly. She ran to tell her father the news.

Upon hearing of the arrival of Jacob, Laban hastened to make him welcome.

Jacob told Laban why he had come to Haran. He asked to be allowed to stay and work for him.

After a month, Laban asked. “What wages do you want for your labor?”

Jacob answered, “I will serve you seven years without wages, if you will let me marry your daughter Rachel.”

Laban agreed, saying, “It is better that I should give her to you than to a stranger. Let it be as you wish.”

From that time Jacob served Laban faithfully. He loved Rachel, and was glad to work for her.

At last Laban gave him Rachel for his wife. In this way Jacob found Rachel his wife in the land of his mother’s people.

Even after his marriage, Jacob stayed with Laban and worked for him. God blessed Jacob and gave him many riches. In time he owned large flocks. He became so rich that at last Laban became envious, and even tried to cheat Jacob.

– from My Bible History in Pictures, by Bishop Louis LaRavoire Morrow, D.D., 1934; it has the Imprimatur of Archbishop Michael J O’Doherty of Manila, Philippines

My Bible History, OT 16 – Jacob’s Dream

Jacob dreamed that he saw a ladder reaching from earth to heaven. Up and down the ladder many angels went. At the top stood God.Jacob dreamed that he saw a ladder reaching from earth to heaven. Up and down the ladder many angels went. At the top stood God.Esau was full of anger and despair. He cried, “Jacob made me sell him my birthright for a mess of pottage. And now he has taken away my blessing!” Esau was so angry that he swore vengeance against Jacob.

Rebecca saw the anger of Esau, and feared for Jacob. She said, “Jacob, my son, your brother Esau is furious that you have taken away his blessing. I am afraid that he will want to kill you. Go to my brother Laban in Haran, and stay there until Esau’s anger has passed. When that time comes, I will send for you, so that you may return.”

Isaac, learning of Jacob’s plan to go to Haran, called him and blessed him. He told him to find a bride among Laban’s daughters.

Jacob set out on his journey towards Haran. One night he stopped to rest in an open field. He took a stone and placed it under his head for a pillow.

As Jacob slept he had a strange dream. He thought he saw a tall ladder reaching from earth to heaven. Up and down the ladder many angels went. At the top God stood. He said to Jacob, “I am the Lord God of Abraham and Isaac. I will give to you and to your children the land where you are now lying. Your children shall be as numberless as the dust of the earth. Through you all the people on earth shall be blessed. I shall be with you wherever you go, to guide you, and to watch over” you. I shall bring you back to this land. I will never leave you until all that I have told you is done.”

Jacob, upon awakening, said to himself, “Surely God was here, and I did not know it. This is the House of God and the gate of Heaven.” And he called that place Bethel, which means House of God. Then he took the stone that he had used for a pillow, poured oil on it. and set it up as a sign.

This stone is a figure of our altars. They are consecrated With holy oil, and on them Christ Himself dwells, acting as intercessor between heaven and earth.

– from My Bible History in Pictures, by Bishop Louis LaRavoire Morrow, D.D., 1934; it has the Imprimatur of Archbishop Michael J O’Doherty of Manila, Philippines